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EXHIBITION OF THE MONTH

BARBAR AGA GHETTO GHETTO ARDAN OZMENOGLU & RBCP

The foundation of my art springs forth from the idea of repetition as it investigates the process of image consumption, history, and permanence in relation to mass production, ritual, and accompanying psychological states. My investigation into our consumption of image splits off into two independent yet complimentary impulses. In some of my pieces, repetition provides social commentary; in others, it conjures a feeling of ritual and a more personal space for a contemplative mood.

In some works I slice a flat image down to its constituent parts, like the levels of a topographic map. The flat image, existing now on multiple slides of glass, is abstracted and becomes sculpture, captured within and between the glass as it interacts with its medium and becomes a different image depending on the position of the viewer. This is the creation of dimension, mood and meaning for the viewer. In other works, I subject images to reproduction on that most ubiquitous yet disposable of modern conveniences, the Post-it.

Social commentary enters into the experience as the images eventually curl and fall away like so many autumn leaves. Whether commenting on the historical durability or transience of an image or sculpting with such fragile media as wire, glass slides or tree branches, my approach to my art and its sources has been and will always be contemporary in the extreme: my investigation into image coexists with aesthetic gestures that challenge, provoke and invite.

ARTISTS

BATTISTA DOMENICO 

« I let the painting show me where to go » Gene Davis

Painting comes naturally to Domenico Battista, just as much as having a good time with friends around a table, discussing, exchanging opinions and memories. Painting seems to be simply what allows life to be something else than just a succession of events. It’s a patient practice, almost secret that enables the artist to link himself to the world, the others and the previous. The honest lightness that motivates Domenico Battista to invent day after day shapes, render this first exhibition after a few years of silence and suspension, precious. The work is recent but draws into a plastic performance that goes back to the foundation of the optic art. Battista built his taste and knowledge in the formal effusion of the 70’s in South America. The artist, witness in his youth of the birth of the modern Venezuela, has been fascinated by the range of joyful colours of the modern vocabulary used by artists that surrounded him.

The optic art with strong chromatic contrasts transformed the perception of the spaces and their use and his playful and sensitive geometry made the world malleable to the artist. Every painting of Domenico Battista is based on an intuitive structure and a conscious sensitivity of colours. The threads open themselves, decompose, cross, cut out the space of the canvas weaving the sceneries of a strange scenography. They don’t have the rigidity of schemas. They wave watering by effect of saturation, but nothing is mechanical there. The work shows the precision and the savoir-faire without cancelling the gesture of the painter that keeps his mellowness, his elegance by staying slightly retreated. Domenico Battista seems to leave the painting build itself. The rhythm is one of improvisation. The coloured beats take apart and make the overlapping more complex. The canvas is not a simple surface, but becomes a sort of cover that comes crossing and fixing the light rays.

The look seems to been taken through the lines, in a vibration rendering impossible any focal distance. We are taken at our own will to rationalise the field of the visible, when the space is structured here only by the elegant music of the coloured lines. Domenico Battista draws us with him in his pictorial wonderment. Maybe he has found in his workshop the secret of the dream machine. Deploying little by little, the possible range of the spectrum of the light, he can authorise himself in this way, he can escape to any chronology, to any comparison and dares one more time to reinvent his life.

 BAYKAM BEDRI

One of Turkey’s internationally most well known artists and intellectuals, Bedri Baykam was born in 1957, in Ankara, Turkey. His father Dr. Suphi Baykam was a famous deputy in the Turkish parliament and his mother Mutahhar Baykam an architect-engineer. He started to paint when he was only two years old, and has had several exhibitions since the age of six in Bern, Geneva, New York, Washington, London, Rome, Munich, Stockholm, etc. during his childhood years, when he was known as a child prodigy.

He studied at the Sorbonne University in Paris from 1975 to 1980 and got an MBA degree. During this time, he also studied drama in L’Actorat, Paris. He lived in California during the years 1980 -1987, studied painting and film-making at the California College of Arts and Crafts, in Oakland between (1980-1983). He had several shows in New York, California and Paris. He returned to Turkey in 1987 and has been living in Istanbul since. Baykam has had 125 one-man-shows in various countries in addition to participating to numerous group shows. One of his most well-known books, “Monkeys’ Right to Paint” published in Turkish and English, brings to light the rights of non western artists and severely criticizes the one sided prejudiced attitude of the western art establishment that he accuses building a one sided, all western art-history.

Baykam is also the writer of a controversial bestseller “The Bone”, published in December 2000. A turn of the Century novel around sex, death, philosophy new sciences, technology and spying, “The Bone” predicted the events of September 11, ten months before it happened in all its details! “The Bone” has been published English in 2005, and in Italian in 2007. Baykam is one of the pioneers of the New-Expressionism movement and of multi-media and photo-painting oriented political art. Since the beginning of the 80’s, he directed several 16 mm. short films and videos and acted in several parts in feature films in Turkey as an actor. Bedri Baykam is also the author of 23 published books.

BRANTLEY  HEBRU                                                   

Hebru Brantley was born 1981 in Bronzeville, Chicago, afro-american area south of Chicago, where he still lives and works. After graduating from Atlanta Clark University with a B.A. in Design and Press Illustration he returned to his hometown Bronzeville. His work is largely inspired by personal memories , as well elements from the culture in fashion,  mainly related to themes from the eighties to nowadays. Hebru uses in his work a large variety of surfaces and techniques, such as wood, spray paint, coffee or even tea, expressing his concern for social and political issues with a playful perspicacity that is nonetheless a message of hope to his own generation.
Hebru’s inspiration comes from the icons of the pop culture, the heros of comics and japanese mangas. Also the pioneers of Street Art such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring play an important role in his work. At present the artist mixes in his paintings scenes of everyday life, personal experiences and fantastic fiction thus creating a fragmented, funny and nearly childish environment that intriguates the viewer. Spray paint is used more often then other mediums, enabeling the artist to add a critical side to the frivolity of the fantasy world of comics.

Hebru Brantley created his own personal style known as afro-futurism. Hebru Brantley’s work is attracting the growing attention of the public and the art critics and his name is gaining recognition in the international art scene, also through his installations and public works exhibited  in Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Miami, Seattle, Los Angeles and New York. He was awarded recently the Redbull Curates Chicago award amid others and was invited by Scope Miami and the tv channel VH1 during the Art Basel Miami  week in 2013. The US magazine Elite Daily rated him « Most Influential Artist Of The Year » in 2013 and big brands like Adidas, Nike and Skyy Vodka have commissioned works . He was also the 2013 ambassador for the watch company Hublot and Ferrari  in the United States.

Future projects include a limited sneaker edition for Jordan Brand in 2015, after realising a big wall for the Soho House Chicago and the big project The Watch. The concept of “The Watch” is to introduce people to the public realm of art by taking down the walls of the gallery and opening them up to the community and to the world giving vibrancy and identity to public arts initiatives. 

CHAMBERS STEPHEN 

Beautiful and Wicked: The Paintings of Stephen Chambers

Stephen Chambers’ paintings are difficult to put into words – though curiously when I think of them they seem as half-understood narratives whose meanings I have somehow forgotten or failed to ascertain. Looking at them one is drawn across to somewhere that is quite dark – like a dreamer who knows he is dreaming and, though fearful, will let the dream unfold out of curiosity. They hint at the knowingness of the inanimate. They are painted with what I can only describe as tenderness.

Away from the physicality of the work, ‘rememberings’ are important and they accumulate to change the images, yet the memories I carry in my mind are never quite what they have seemed when faced with the reality of the paintings again. From the other direction – seeing them for the first time some of these images provoke a sense of recognition – but of what I am not certain

I know that I felt this recognition seeing Orson Welles (1997) in the exhibition Silent Running, but I had to go back to the picture to understand its peculiarity. To see the strangeness of the form made by the blackish, abstract shape which cuts off the figure at the neck denying it a straight-forward representational reading. To see that the background, almost metallic in the colour of the underpainting, was in fact painted last – as foreground and encroaches over the head, ‘meddling’ with the face, forcing one to see the image as ‘faulted’.

The initial sensation of the painting is of the kind of formality of a traditional Japanese print and yet the insistence of the dark shape (sliding again out of the picture plain), itself interrupted by rods of orange which jangle and disrupt the space within the shape, makes me think of recent paintings by Gary Hume in a much more contemporary referencing. Many of the more recent images have this kind of pictorial ‘starkness’ where a single figure or groups are isolated by different devices within the space of the canvas and must be read abstractly and figuratively in the same moment.

These figures are not without power – there is a violence implicit in the eyes and in the gesticulating limbs, but if one looks closer one sees that they are all literally ‘pinned’ into the painted image. Dots swarm towards eyes and around bodies, pointed shafts of colour tear into the backgrounds, bearing down upon and transfixing the inhabitants of these paintings. These figures are not human, and like the displaced objects in earlier works, they are trapped in some kind of circumstantial continuum. One strains to hear their whispering – but they have no mouths with which to speak. In trying to understand why this work affects me as it does – and it does deeply – I have come to realise how resistant Chambers’ art is to any kind of linear analysis – words constrict resonance and one cannot divorce the meanings of these images from their physical manifestations. The subtle forebodings, the sense of arrival at places one has not been but which one recognises – these sensations come not simply from the image, but from somewhere within the paintings themselves and it is as if by making one completely aware of the ‘skin’ of the painting that Chambers reveals what is underneath as somehow palpable.

These paintings exist paradoxically, in the sense that they are emphatically present as sensual objects yet redolent with hints and suggestions of subjective purposes, which inform the object but are literally absent (in the narrative sense) in the image. In one way Chambers’ images form a pretext for making artworks which operate on two levels simultaneously: their presence as objects disrupt their possible meanings and it is this which forces the viewer into a relationship with the work which is one not only of interpretation but also one of experiencing. Chambers is articulate about the influences upon his work and provides a paper trial of seemingly random but utterly plausible visual images in answer to some of my questions – but the ultimate meanings of these paintings seem as elusive to him as they are to those coming upon them. Film informs Chambers’ paintings on a number of levels: it is a time-based medium, which creates its own logic, controlling not only the information given to the viewer, but also when it is given. It is a medium which can underline the sense of the viewer as voyeur, isolated in darkness, subject at one to the images on the screen but secret in the thoughts that these images provoke.

Hysterical, a video projection made by Douglas Gordon in 1995, showed sequences of the same black and white silent film, playing at slightly different speeds. Two male figures in old-fashioned clothes bend over a woman sitting on a bed in seemingly amiable conversation until the woman suddenly throws herself about, apparently wailing and renting her hair. The men restrain her back down onto the bed and the scenario takes on an appalling sense of farce as the woman, fighting to rise, is bounced up and down by the bed springs. The repetition and the alteration that occurs when looking from one enactment of this bizarre drama to another, forces in question after question. What are we looking at? Is this film old footage of a real event? Is the woman insane? Are the men her doctors or her torturers? Has the artist contrived the whole work with actors? It is in the tiny, jarring details and in the sly, dark humour which plays across the work provoking silent anxieties, that I find parallels with Chambers’ images. These works entice you in and yet their effect is one of estrangement.

If Stephen Chambers’ paintings can be described as depicting states of mind it would imply that on some level they are profoundly autobiographical. They are complex paintings, beautiful and wicked. They show longings and misapprehensions. Like fairy tales they lead you in with deceptive simplicity. In the particular vision of reality Chambers shows us we must see with the eyes of a child, for whom the world is timeless and everything is always in the present.

Emma Hill 

DIAMOND  JAMIE 

« Mother Love »

Jamie Diamond, nĂ©e en 1983, photographe basĂ©e Ă  New York, est diplomĂ©e de l’UniversitĂ© de Pennsylvania et de Wisconsin, professeur de photographie Ă  l’UniversitĂ© de Wisconsin, explore dans son travail la relation entre fiction et rĂ©alitĂ©, les moyens d’échange, l’intimitĂ© et la perception.

Dans sa derniĂšre sĂ©rie de travaux, « Mother Love », Jamie Diamond analyse le jeu de rĂŽles de la maternitĂ©. En 2010 elle dĂ©couvre le Reborning  en tombant  sur EBay sur des poupĂ©es hyperrĂ©alistes vendues Ă  des prix exorbitants. Elle en achĂšte une et c’est le dĂ©but de son nouveau projet.

Le « Reborning »(renaissance, renaitre), subculture contemporaine amĂ©ricaine, implique la crĂ©ation de poupĂ©es hyperrĂ©alistes dont on prend soin comme si c’était de vrais bĂ©bĂ©s ! Les « reborners », crĂ©ateurs des poupĂ©es, vendent leurs Ɠuvres Ă  des collectionneurs qui « adoptent » la poupĂ©e, qui aura sa propre nurserie Ă  la maison, retrouvent d’autres collectionneurs lors de rĂ©unions, d’anniversaires et de « baby-showers ». Le fondement de cette subculture est un jeu de rĂŽles, les participantes jouent Ă  la mĂšre parfaite et altruiste, la poupĂ©e est le totem. Jamie a Ă©tĂ© fascinĂ©e par cette fiction, par la communautĂ© qui en est issue et afin de mieux comprendre les motifs de ces femmes, elle devient « reborner » professionnelle. Pendant  deux ans elle suit des cours, assiste Ă  des rĂ©unions, apprend et surtout elle les photographie.

Dans « Neuf mois de Reborning », elle crĂ©e ses propres bĂ©bĂ©s, ainsi qu’une vraie nurserie, nommĂ©e « The Bitten Apple », dans son studio et elle les propose Ă  l’adoption sur EBay. Pour son projet Amy, elle collabore avec huit cĂ©lĂ©britĂ©s de la scĂšne, leur demandant d’interprĂ©ter et d’idĂ©aliser la mĂȘme poupĂ©e selon leurs propres critĂšres. Le bĂ©bĂ© final est photographiĂ© dans une  pose trĂšs vieille Ă©cole, sur une toile de fond des annĂ©es 80, puis rendu Ă  son crĂ©ateur et vendu sur EBay. Son travail avec la communautĂ© des Reborner lui a permis d’explorer la zone grise comprise entre rĂ©alitĂ© et fiction, oĂč un lien affectif se tisse avec un objet inanimĂ©, entre la personne et la poupĂ©e, entre l’artiste et son Ɠuvre, monde Ă©trange et rĂ©el Ă  la fois. Au cours des trois annĂ©es consacrĂ©es Ă  ce projet, Jamie a Ă©tĂ© fascinĂ©e par la fiction, l’interprĂ©tation et les rĂ©alisations artistiques incroyables de cet univers de fantaisie.

DOGAN ISMET 

"I see everything through the mirror."

İsmet Doğan was born in 1957 in Adiyaman (Turkey). He graduated from Marmara University, Faculty of Fine Arts in Istanbul in 1983. In 1987 he received a French Government Scholarship in Paris where he spent two years. In the 1980s, under the influence of Dadaism, İsmet Doğan created collage, graffiti, and assemblage used ready-mades and works on the problematic of culture, tradition and history by plastic means.

As a thinker his attention was drawn by the aspects of violence and trauma, especially during the century of westernization and modernization in Turkey. He approached to modern cultural phenomenon reactively and critically. By introducing Latin letters for instance into his art, Doğan revealed the language reform in Turkey in the beginning of the 20th century as a political vehicle of a social engineering which subsequently caused the nation an alienation from its own culture. Thus seeing in this a violent political act which resulted in trauma.

In terms of Doğan’s critics of modernism, written letters assembled to words (as Logos or Ba^Ba) or scattered randomly over the canvas stay an essential component of his oeuvre till today. In 1990s, after receiving the French Government Scholarship, he did not intent to stay in Paris but returned to his native country and resided in Istanbul.     Here an installation as a form of realization of his artwork assumed ever greater importance for Doğan’s art practice.

“What I am trying to do as an artist is a sort of intervention or modification of the existing visuality” - so Ismet Doğan. In 2000s he integrated another critical dimension into his artwork; especially interested on the subject of colonialism he approached a strategy of art historical references and cinematographic material alteration.      Doğan undertakes a change by integration of his own image into the filmstrip commenting thus on the identification and empathy with movie characters and at the same time on the hegemony of western visual culture. On the other hand the movie material gaines thus a status of an art motif. A mirror has one of the most essential roles as a working material for Doğan.

In the half-matt or transparent, convex and concave mirrors the viewer is reflected, multiplied, and confronted with his own body as a stranger and even more, operating as something else, namely as a part of an artwork. Recent projects: Eat Me (2012), All is External (2011), Close Up (2008), Penetratum (2006). Neither inside nor outside my body (2006) presenting photography, painting, sculpture, video, and installation. Ismet Dogan lives and works in Istanbul.  

EDALATKHAH  HOSSEIN 

 For further information please contact the gallery.

 EDMOND  LOUIS VINCENT

Born in Nimes, France, Vincent Edmond Louis attended Central Saint Martins College of Art in London, England from which he received an unconditional offer. Having pursued photography from a very young age, Vincent has constantly tackled various ways of pushing the boundaries of what we have come to consider traditional Fine Art Photography. Katelijne de Backer (Armory, Scope, Lehmann Maupin) has actually named this technique “Photography Revisited”.

Whether he adds paint to enhance the image or remove the subject matter, recounts his memories by simply writing on the photograph, depicts the passing of time by tearing up and putting back together portraits, or manipulating an image to create larger-than-life installation, Vincent is continuously seeking to add a multitude of layers to the otherwise twodimensional medium.

Hence allowing the viewer to participate in the work. When lacking subject material Vincent can be found in his studio reviving discarded everyday objects and giving them a new life as art work. Always keeping an open mind, Vincent continuously searches for new frontiers, travelling the world to gain an insight into foreign cultures and documenting characters from different backgrounds and styles.

The viewer is invited to discover an unknown world, where the image is placed in a new setting, thus makes you use your imagination. Vincent Edmond Louis has exhibited in New York, Paris, London, Stockholm, New Delhi, Monaco, Miami, Gothenburg, Bogota, Istanbul,

EVERS JOAQUIM 

 For further information please contact the gallery.

GALLOPIN DARA 

Born in 1982 the in Geneva the Swiss / Iranian artists made his first artistic steps while studying in Cambridge. He continued his studies in Oxford, England before a drastic change in his life and a move to Madrid, Spain i twa sthere when he finally decided to devote his life completly to art and not part-time.

As a result he went to the Libera Accademia di Belle Arte, RUFA and finished his bachelor of Arts at the prestigous Ecole Cantonal d`art de Lausanne. Gallopin quickly started to focus on his love for pop art and his fascination for the 80`s. His paintings are a mix of shapes, colors and souvenirs.

Feeling limited to the paper and the wall he decided to mix his artistic vision with engineering and make the impossible possible. His sculptures are a hommage to childhood dreams and futuristic visions. An art version of the famous Hoverboard or different hommages to cartoons are proof of this vision. In 2013 he participated at the group show at the gallery entiteld The Young Collective. Since then his work was shown at several art fairs in Miami, Basel, London and Istanbul.

GUNYELI MEHMET 

Mehmet Gunyeli’s body of black and white photographs, reduced to outline the Darvish dancers, haunt everyone who views them. His series Dervishers / Beliefs’ Dancing, executed in 2007, presents stylised compositions of the Dervish dance and has already attracted a lot of attention from critics and gallerists. Gunyeli contrasts this 13th century cultural inheritance, with the global mass culture that overpowers the world today. 
Born in Turkey, Gunyeli has often indulged his curiosity for other communities and before he embanked on the subject of Dervish dance, the artist produced a series titled The Colours of Earth, and Mystery of East, reflecting on the vivid and lucid colors of the Indian subcontinent. In 2006 these photographs were combined in a book titled quite simply, India. Previously his photographic account of travel in Cuba was edited into the book Viva Cuba Libre (2005). In both expeditions GĂŒnyeli records the daily lives of people from different continents in their own habitual and ethnic environments. His work contains meaningful contrast, created through his use of close-up portraits, which offer an intimate taste of the culture, while his use of the wider lense suggests a perspective of alienation.

A man of many talents and aspirations, Gunyeli touches people’s heart through his unique depiction of the Dervish dance. His world perspective shines through his art with a vision that makes it simultaneously recognisable yet abstract, distant yet intimate.
Among others his works are exhibited at Istanbul Modern Museum, Houston Museum of Fine Art, Borusan Contemporary and the Elgiz museum 

 JONES ALLEN

The art of Allen Jones is an extended meditation on the roles we play. How do we situate ourselves in the world? What constitutes personality? Jones catalogues the ways in which people deal with the threat of extinction: strategies for survival in the mad dance of life, with the chance of some fun along the way.

This is no detached scientific analysis, but a vibrant dialogue, full of wit and humour. Allen Jones is fortunate in his versatility, able to turn with equal skill from oil painting to sculpture, then back to watercolour, print-making or drawing. The variousness of medium does not undermine the impact of his work, for the consistency of his aims and subject provides an essential continuity.

And in a very real sense, we (the audience) make his meaning. Jones likes to tease his viewers visually, as well as thematically. The line created by the edge of a steel plate will – in the active process of describing a shape – move around a sculpture, appearing almost disembodied, before transforming into a plane, which in turn will box-in a form with suggested volume, before moving out into a line again.

It’s as if the artist practises sleight-of-hand, yet the effects are optical, not intentionally deceptive. As Jones himself says, the work “moves in and out of statement”. ( excerpt Andrew Lambirth – “Kaleidoscope” for Galerie Frank Pages)

LAURENCE ET RENAUD

Born in France in 1969 and 1966, Laurence Guille and Renaud Loisy did their graphic art studies in Paris. They met in 1990. They worked as photographers and producers for several advertisement agencies and won many prices in the field of communication. In 2000, they decided to collaborate more closely together and sign their creations under one only name, “Laurence et Renaud”. In 2005, they presented their work at the gallery of art Frank Pagùs, who represents them at the moment. From 2008, they lived in Normandy in France where they pursue their photographic researches, which is a constant quest of essentials by working on sober aesthetics, without artifices.

Lunch Break (portraits/ still live)
“We worked on what seemed to be essential for us: the man can live because he feeds himself. This simple assessment allowed us to highlight the immersion of the human into the consumption society. To live, he must eat and to eat, he must work. We treated this subject in an extremely simple way without any kind of artifices, using only the stylization proposed by our subjects, in order to fix an image of the occidental man into the society of consumption. The aestheticisms of the lunches (packaging, plastic, blister pack) testify of the world: everything is proportioned, uniform, industrialised. The expression of the persons is almost empty of felling, the packaging or envelope hiding the emotion or evidence of a true absence of free will? Though, everything seems reassuring and peaceful.”

Red Alert: “For this series, we needed a scenery of wild nature, worn out of any sign of human presence. The airplanes are fixed in their movement, hanging into the air and time without any physic contact with the landscape. We opposed two elements to perfect beauty: the nature and the human genius represented by an ultra sophisticated machine conceived for destruction. We have followed this experience by integrating other elements symptomatic of the duality between man and nature; a phone box, missiles, cannons
 We have treated all these integrations like the two worlds could not interpenetrate each other. This idea is strengthened by the absence of structure or access way, which gives us a profound feeling of isolation, that doesn’t put the man facing his biotope but puts him face to face with himself, to his own reflection about the world he’s living in.”

Les Zeppelins: “In this images wanted as they were marines, we wished to stop the time by awakening an incredible machine, to the slow and silent moving. Les zeppelins float in a frame of fullness; it’s the balance of weightlessness. Like flying cetacean, they invite us to a reflection about serenity, about the man facing his choices, about a meeting between man and nature almost ideal, harmonious and brought back together that would help us to leave the shores for some mysterious trips.”

The meat islands: “This series is a double trigger. We found funny to assess how that the shape of a steak put on a plate can look like an island. A new world just emerged in our kitchen
after the sandwiches islands, the meat islands existed finally
to better interrogate us on our common destiny. What represents the planet for humanity?

The shapes: “This series is inspired from the novels of Ray Bradbury “The Martian chronicles”. By imagining what could have been an intelligent life on another planet, we noticed that just our own emotions became materialised under the appearance of undefined shapes. Not being human, not animal, not vegetal, though they’re really alive, and evolve in their own world, questioning themselves maybe, also about their place in the universe.

MA DESHENG                                            

Chinese artist born in 1952 in Beijing, Ma Desheng is a self-taught artist who began his career as an industrial designer and engraver. He quickly changes his affection to traditional chinese calligraphy and poetry, but never mixes both worlds, since in his opinion they are much to different.

He nevertheless realizes after a while that chinese calligraphy, with its strict codes, leaves him little space to express his true emotions. This search for individual expression is one of the founding principles of the XingXing (The Stars) group, first post Mao critical art movement, of which Ma Desheng is one of the leading figures. To get attention they hang illegally 150 works of 23 different artists outside of the national fine-arts Museum of Beijing. A “violent” action, which nevertheless will lead to the recognition of the art movement by the chinese press the following year.

Within the group are artists of such renomee as Li Shuang, Huang Rui, Wan Keping and Ai WeiWei. XingXing will be the first intellectual art movement to point out the importance of the individual in the general society and as such is quickly under rouge critique from the press and the general public, as the artistic message is seen as a pretext for a political message.

This pressure and the lack of interest in the artistic message will force many artists of the movement to leave the country. Leaving the country and the personal changes that come with such a rupture will cause the last definite argument for Ma to radically change his paintings. He turns his back to calligraphy and coded art and discovers the world of the abstract. Finally free of this burden he starts using distortion of shapes to give the human body, especially the female body a more eternal even celestial shape, the stone. Like his vision of the world stones are solitary, but build of many different layers and lived experiences through time, before becoming part of the never ending cosmos. Stones are, as humans at first sight strong, stable and full of energy, but actually witnesses of life, made of earthly material and in constant instability. Ma’s paintings, his stones, which resemble an abstract body, are a witness of his adoration of the shapes and materials of the rock and finally his love for the mountain, leading to his desire for a cosmic connection, a search for a cosmic spiritually. His technique shows this duality, Ma mixes color pigments with plaster, which gives his paintings a certain structure, sculpted paintings. Focusing on the eternal motif he is looking for leads to the vain of the landscape in his works, hence it would only compose a visual distraction and be in contrast to his fundamental thought: the place of the individual in the big cosmos.

Ma Desheng is the founder of the seminal Stars Group, the first major art movement to appear in China after Mao died and the Cultural Revolution ended. The breakthrough group included the young Ai Weiwei, Wang Keping, Huang Rui among other rebel artists who dared to jettison the official, propagandistic style of Socialist Realism, in order to express themselves in free flowing individual styles that involved using the then prohibited forms of abstraction in their works. In 1979 they held the first exhibition illegally, hanging their work on the fence outside Beijing's National Art Museum, only to have the show shut down by the authorities.

Ma Desheng lead a protest march from "Democracy Wall" to the Communist Party municipal building and is famous for the radical speech he gave calling for freedom. After the Democracy movement was crushed, he emigrated first to Lausanne, and now lives in Paris.

OZMENOGLU ARDAN                                                    

The foundation of my art springs forth from the idea of repetition as it investigates the process of image consumption, history, and permanence in relation to mass production, ritual, and accompanying psychological states. My investigation into our consumption of image splits off into two independent yet complimentary impulses. In some of my pieces, repetition provides social commentary; in others, it conjures a feeling of ritual and a more personal space for a contemplative mood.

In some works I slice a flat image down to its constituent parts, like the levels of a topographic map. The flat image, existing now on multiple slides of glass, is abstracted and becomes sculpture, captured within and between the glass as it interacts with its medium and becomes a different image depending on the position of the viewer. This is the creation of dimension, mood and meaning for the viewer.

In other works, I subject images to reproduction on that most ubiquitous yet disposable of modern conveniences, the Post-it. Social commentary enters into the experience as the images eventually curl and fall away like so many autumn leaves. Whether commenting on the historical durability or transience of an image or sculpting with such fragile media as wire, glass slides or tree branches, my approach to my art and its sources has been and will always be contemporary in the extreme: my investigation into image coexists with aesthetic gestures that challenge, provoke and invite. Ardan Özmenoglu, 2008

PERCIN BURCU

Born in Anakara in 1979, Burcu Perçin graduated from the Department of Painting at Mimar Sinan University in 2002. Producing works using mainly oil-on-canvas technique, Perçin focuses on spaces. These spaces are an outcome of the compositions found in the photographs Perçin shoots in abandoned places she discovers.

Perçin depicts the industrial areas she focuses on with a unique technique characterized with pronounced and lively brush strokes. We come across with the spaces and objects in Perçin’s photos in forms of various collages she later designs along the process of production. Combining spaces like industrial zones, factories, depots, dockyards among others. Sometimes with objects found in these spaces or with objects and images she finds elsewhere, Perçin designs a new composition and narrates these reinterpreted photo-collages on canvas. In her latest productions, we find graffiti as a recently included component.

Drawing attention towards forgotten places, Perçin questions the memory attributed to the space. However, the graffiti on the paintings implies that these spaces are still being used and that some traces are subtly left around. Standing out with her works on canvas, Perçin also produces photo-prints intervened with photographs, collages and paint.

PONCET ANTOINE

Poncet’s sculpture is the symbiosis of shape and volume. The perfection of volumes and the elegance of the shapes are breath-taking as well as the beauty of his translucide patina and pure marbles. Poncet’s work is sensual, smooth, round, the mere expression of harmony, seducing and attracting the viewer.

One cannot refrain from touching, the finger follows the smooth edges, runs around the opening, stops shortly and carries on in another direction. It is intentional. “Movement is essential in my work. Everything is movement in nature, in life. The search for perfect balance is essential for sculpture, pushing aside with the palm of the hands everything that stands out and could lead to a fall, just keeping in its apparent envelope this rare and inexplicable life, like water living between two shores.

If it is difficult to push the material to the wall to reach a feeling of fulfilment, it is this same sheer difficulty that fascinates me. To make sculpture, you need to live the material, understand it, love it
.” Poncet was familiar with Arp, Brancusi, Laurens, Penalba and Moore to name a few.

QU  LEI LEI    

by Michael Sullivan                          

The American art historian and critic Bernard Berenson famously declared that one of the essential element in painting was what he called “tactile values”. By contrast with the Renaissance arts he so much admired, Oriental painting he felt lacked that quality and as a result, as he put it, “the arts of the Orient soon weary”.
What would he have thought of the work of Qu Leilei? Most probably he would have said that it was not Chinese, merely an attempt to imitate Western art. But were he alive today — he died in 1959 — he might see things differently. For Chinese art has undergone profound changes in recent decades, as Chinese artists have taken from Western art what they needed for their own purposes. This process is not new. It began soon after the Revolution of 1911, when artists of the Lingnan School heard about Western art in Japan and attempted, following the Japanese, to adapt their own tradition to take account of new forms and technique.

What, then, is so special about Qu Leilei? Three things, I feel, mark him out. The first is sheer talent. As a painter and draftsman, there is nothing he cannot do. Surely the human hand is one of the most difficult things to draw; but not only does he draws hands beautifully; he makes of them a powerful image expressive of thoughts, feelings, humanity, and love. The second thing, is that  while some of the most successful modern Chinese artists, having achieved a popular style or subject-matter, keep on repeating themselves,   Qu Leilei, when he has fully explored the possibilities of one form, or subject, moves on to explore another. So he has never stayed still for long. From his first naïve work  in the 1979 and 1980 Beijing exhibitions of the radical Stars, of which he was one of the youngest members, he has moved on to develop one theme after another, culminating in the splendid paintings in the Hands series, and the striking  large-scale  portraits Everyone’s Life is an Epic, which combined brilliant brush and ink technique with sympathetic insight into the character of the subject.  And now—the nudes.

 REVEMAN FRIEDERIKE

Born in 1984 in Germany, Friederike Reveman studied at the Academy for Visual Arts in Leipzig before graduating with a Masters at the New York Academy of Art. Her large scale paintings are strange portraits, weird landscapes, twisted spaces born out of the clash between social cultural ideals of beauty and the imagination and personal souvenirs of the artist. Reveman’s work bothers the viewer, he cannot stay indifferent.

It is the very own quest of the artist on the complex mechanism of mass media and pop culture, questioning the idealization of perfection and beauty and the way this leads nowadays to serious social issues. Reveman’s paintings depict a fake race of female figures living in a world where everything is bright and yet uncertain. The figures are wowanly but at the same time very childish, often naked, fidgeting in a revealing, at times violent way.

The environment is usually overcrowded and quite often they seem to be locked in a structure that looks like a theater scene or a play cage. This imaginary world, pure fantasy of the artist’s mind, enables her to analyze and question the disturbing way in which women and children see themselves and their surroundings in today’s world.

SALUSTIANO

Born in Sevilla, Spain, 1965 Specialization on Painting at Fine Arts University of Seville, Spain Salustiano succeeds in eliminating any reference to time or place in his works, leaving the crimson youth to speak for themselves. This results in paintings that do not remind the viewer of anything, essentially leaving one without any anchor or cognitive framework with which to label them. The remoteness of the visages that seem to float in an endless landscape of burgundy, white or black mean that Salustiano’s works simply convey the emotions of those looking at them, never the emotions of the artist himself.

The viewer projects his or her own lived experiences onto the painted faces, faces that sometimes portray a severeness, sometimes a remoteness, but always an irony within the lifelike eyes. The work of this artist begins when he photographs the model. Although he usually does not talk much to them, there is always a complicity: “You realise that it’s not just a serene or beautiful face, they are very special people, and curiously many of them are related to music”.

All this self-interpretation is not to say, however, that Salustiano can in any way be categorized as an abstract artist. Instead, for every torso stripped of external meaning, there is a quaint smile that hearkens back to classicism or a pair of cupid bow lips reminiscent of the Renaissance.

RECENT EXHIBITIONS

2012
ART STAGE SINGAPORE. Galerie Frank Pages Baden-Baden, Germany
SOLO-SHOW. Leonhard Ruethmueller Gallery. Basel, Switzerland
SOLO-SHOW. Cor Galerie. Zurich, Switzerland Scope Art Fair. Galerie Brockstedt. Basel, Switzerland ScopeBasel, Switzerland with Galerie Frank Pages
SOLO SHOW. Galerie Brockstedt. Berlin, Germany
ART KARLSRUHE. Galerie Frank Pages Karlsruhe, Germany
ART KARLSRUHE. Obrist Galerie. Karlsruhe, Germany Art Wynwood Art Fair. Miami.
USA THE TWELFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS. Apama Mackey Gallery. Houston,
USA CONTEMPORARY ISTANBUL. Galerie Frank Pages and Galerie Brockstedt, Istanbul, Turkey

2011
THE MISSING PEACE. San Antonio Museum of Art. San Antonio, Texas.
USA PULSE ART FAIR. Kavachnina Contemporary. Los Angeles, USA
PALM BEACH CONT. ART FAIR. Kavachnina Contemporary. Palm Beach, USA
Contemporary Alternative I. Kavachnina Contemporary. Miami. USA
BLACK. Solo-show. Kavachnina Contemporary. Miami, USA
Contemporary Alternative II. Kavachnina Contemporary. Miami, USA
THE MISSING PEACE. Santa Clara University. Santa Clara, California, USA
I WAS THERE. Frederic Boloix Gallery. Sun Valley, USA
ART BY GENÈVE. Leonhard Ruethmueller Gallery. Geneva, Switzerland Kunst 11 ZĂŒrich International Contemporary Art Fair. Cor Galerie. Zurich, Switzerland
FRENTE A FRENTE: DAS SPANISCHE PORTRAIT. 100 Kubik Galerie. Cologne, Germany
I WAS THERE. 100 Kubik Galerie. Cologne, Germany
ART KARLSRUHE. Leonhard Ruethmueller Gallery. Karlsruhe, Germany

STAEHLI BEATRICE

FEATHER MARKS | Christian Reder” 

A found feather provides joy as only a few objects do with such immediacy. As signs of flying, feathers hint at possibilities, at lightness, at hovering. They are linked with notions of how the space turns when you are in the air and all horizons, all perspectives lose their reference to a fixed point of view. The feather is a symbol of the negation of everything that is heavy, of all hindrances, a symbol of taking off without effort and a controllable fall. Men have always thought it unfair that birds have feathers and they do not. Imitating birds has thus remained one of man’s lasting goals.

Since feathers make it possible to fly, protect against heat, cold, and wetness, and are both disguise and adornment, a complex cosmos of communicatively erotic signals, they are to be regarded as ”artifacts” of another world in its own right. The world of eagles, falcons, pigeons, swallows, and birds-of-paradise with its enormous impact on all forms of symbolizing has left its mark on patterns, even on patterns of utopian mobile societies which believe in having found their rules forever.

Yet, the mechanically reflexive processes only resemble freedom even in the feathered world. Nevertheless, this world still holds many secrets: despite all successes of investigation and copying, nobody knows how flights coordinate their wild and, as it seems, often completely unmotivated maneuvers or how the navigation of migratory birds works. The comprehensive collection of feathers Béatrice StÀhli draws upon in her recent works dates from a time in which rules of conservation had not set certain limits to the decimation of endangered species.

Treating the feathers almost as relics, StÀhli increases the value of her finds and emphasizes their melancholy aura. But what they stand for at first sight is laconically minimized and transformed through the way they are presented. The exotic character of their material and its seductiveness, the stereotypical images of beauty, pride, and natural freedom each original plumage triggers, are exposed to a present-day differentiating gaze. What one remains aware of is the fact that romantic approaches shape meanings independently of all deconstruction. And, at the same time, one is irritated that a lot of things have happened to the feathers and the associations linked with them, as a number of them found in one place, be it in nature or in a store, generally points to some tragedy. Being declared to be something artificial and traded as merchandise, the differences to the natural are blured. In some cases, the colors and the marking of the feathers still correspond to the original condition; in others, they have been changed. What seems to be rare becomes more valuable, dearer. Feeble gray and black shades are regarded as too trite. StÀhli uses such differences in order to let the material show itself off to advantage.

It is what it is. Forming feather surfaces, feather bodies, or mobile objects, the material, even if it has been colored, reveals how subtly it reflects light and how its qualities, in a very nuanced manner, allude to the functions in which the existence of feathers is grounded. Among birds, part of the more conspicuous plumage is female, part male; among men, the more impressive plumes were reserved for chieftains and kings who wanted to distinguish themselves clearly from others. The feather itself has preserved a female aura. »

 VARI SOPHIA

Her work is strongly influenced by Mayan, Egyptian, Olmec, and Cycladic traditions as well as Ancient and Baroque aesthetics. Specializing in bronze sculpture, she is also known for collages, oils and watercolors. Her work is an investigation of form and balance. 

Like the sculptures, her collages, or papers on canvas, as well as her watercolors and oil paintings have a certain playfulness and liveliness, with compositions that are pushed into the realm of dimensional space.  Vari’s work has been consistently characterized by its extraordinary sensuality and expressive quality. In her use of patina along with contrasting colors such as black with white, red, blue or yellow, she creates an immediate visual effect that gives her sculptures a certain presence. 

She creates intricate forms that interact with themselves, the space and the viewer. Using color to contribute to the movement of her pieces, her sculptural works, both the monumental and the smaller formats, have an autonomous life. This is created from the permutation of shapes with a sense of lightness and suspension, yet resolving space and structure with an imposing bearing. 

 VAUTRELLE BRUNO

Born 1968 in Chalons, in the Champagne, France. Master of photography at the ISNA of Metz, France, in 1990. Assistant of Bruno Jarret and Roger Turqueti from 1993 to 1997 for shooting still life in the studio.

Independent photographer since 1997, mainly works in the studio (still life : CosmĂ©tic, Jewelry, Liquours, Luxury Accessories for advertising campaigns for press and bill-boards ) Visuals commissioned for advertising campaign by Guerlain, Jil Sander, Vichy, LancĂŽme, Vittel, Hennessy, Maxmara, Ford, Lancaster, L’OrĂ©al, Biotherm, Clarins, JP Gaultier, Chanel, Dior, Clan Campbell, Glen Turner, Carte Noire, Nespresso, Avene, Lipton, J&B 

Represented by Cécile Rodrigue from 2000 to 2008 and Guillaume Derville LeBookMaker  since 2009 for professional advertising still life shooting. Vautrelle is very much influenced by the group f.64, founded in 1932 by Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston, thus showing a nearly fanatical quest for style preciseness  and technical perfection. Vautrelle is always in search of the magic harmony that light creates between the different elements of a landscape, much more than actually rendering shapes and materials. His images often have therefore a disembodied and immaterial aspect.

 WAKULTSCHICK MAXIM

Born in Byelorussia in 1973, Maxim Wakultschik lives and works in Dusseldorf, Germany, where he studied at the Dusseldorf Art Academy under Beate Schiff and Janis Kounellis. His paintings, objects, and installations employ figurative images which are multifaceted and dynamic in process.

Wakultschik’s work mainly deals with technics pushing the boundaries of classical painting, thus widening the limit of painting into an object. In his realistic way of painting, the work becomes a three-dimensional conceptual object by means of techniques and materials. The artist uses classical materials like canvas, oil or acrylic but also wood, metal, paper and plexiglass.

One of Wakultschick’s main theme are faces, represented as paintings, objects or reliefs. They are often famous faces, from the glamour world or chosen artists but they can also just be no-names.

 XINGJIAN GAO

Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2000, Gao Xingjian’s paintings convey contemporary inspiration in the form of traditional Chinese ink painting. He has established a new ink wash painting style that is a combination of the techniques for traditional Chinese ink painting and the formal qualities of the modern abstract style from the West. He has well incorporated the monochromatic nature of ink paining to portray the movement of light and to awaken the viewers’ senses and emotion.

With his exploration in light and shadow, he brings the viewers into the space and time of meditation. His smooth brush movement is like the gentle rhythm of music that floats in the air, while the blank space gives the viewers unlimited room for imagination. In contrast with the small figurative forms and the quiet atmosphere, the extensive and delicate images create a Zen inspiration, and effectively reflect life marked by vicissitudes.

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News

PAST EXHIBITIONS

  • STEPHEN CHAMBERS
  • Gangs of New York
  • Date: 
    feb.4 – mar.28
  • vernissage: fev. 4 – 18:30
  • L'artiste est prĂ©sent
  • FRIEDERIKE REVEMAN ET JAMIE DIAMOND
  • Painting & Photography
  • Date: 
    dec. 4 / 2014 – jan. 17 / 2015
  • vernissage: dec. 4 / 2014 - 18:30
  • En prĂ©cense des artistes

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  • HEBRU BRANTLEY
  • And all I got was sunshine
  • Date: 
    octt. 2 – nov. 13 / 2014
  • vernissage: oct. 2 / 2014
  • En prĂ©sence de l'artiste

 

  • STEPHEN CHAMBERS
  • Gangs of New York
  • Date: 
    feb.4 – mar.28
  • vernissage: fev. 4 – 18:30
  • L'artiste est prĂ©sent

 

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3D VISIT

PAINTINGS

 BATTISTA DOMENICO

« I let the painting show me where to go »

Gene Davis

Painting comes naturally to Domenico Battista, just as much as having a good time with friends around a table, discussing, exchanging opinions and memories. Painting seems to be simply what allows life to be something else than just a succession of events.  It’s a patient practice, almost secret that enables the artist to link himself to the world, the others and the previous.

The honest lightness that motivates Domenico Battista to invent day after day shapes, render this first exhibition after a few years of silence and suspension, precious. The work is recent but draws into a plastic performance that goes back to the foundation of the optic art. Battista built his taste and knowledge in the formal effusion of the 70’s in South America. The artist, witness in his youth of the birth of the modern Venezuela, has been fascinated by the range of joyful colours of the modern vocabulary used by artists that surrounded him. The optic art with strong chromatic contrasts transformed the perception of the spaces and their use and his playful and sensitive geometry made the world malleable to the artist.

Every painting of Domenico Battista is based on an intuitive structure and a conscious sensitivity of colours. The threads open themselves, decompose, cross, cut out the space of the canvas weaving the sceneries of a strange scenography. They don’t have the rigidity of schemas. They wave watering by effect of saturation, but nothing is mechanical there. The work shows the precision and the savoir-faire without cancelling the gesture of the painter that keeps his mellowness, his elegance by staying slightly retreated.

Domenico Battista seems to leave the painting build itself. The rhythm is one of improvisation. The coloured beats take apart and make the overlapping more complex. The canvas is not a simple surface, but becomes a sort of cover that comes crossing and fixing the light rays. The look seems to been taken through the lines, in a vibration rendering impossible any focal distance. We are taken at our own will to rationalise the field of the visible, when the space is structured here only by the elegant music of the coloured lines. Domenico Battista draws us with him in his pictorial wonderment. Maybe he has found in his workshop the secret of the dream machine.  Deploying little by little, the possible range of the spectrum of the light, he can authorise himself in this way, he can escape to any chronology, to any comparison and dares one more time to reinvent his life.

 BAYKAM BEDRI                                                    

One of Turkey’s internationally most well known artists and intellectuals, Bedri Baykam was born in 1957, in Ankara, Turkey. His father Dr. Suphi Baykam was a famous deputy in the Turkish parliament and his mother Mutahhar Baykam an architect-engineer. He started to paint when he was only two years old, and has had several exhibitions since the age of six in Bern, Geneva, New York, Washington, London, Rome, Munich, Stockholm, etc. during his childhood years, when he was known as a child prodigy.

He studied at the Sorbonne University in Paris from 1975 to 1980 and got an MBA degree. During this time, he also studied drama in L’Actorat, Paris. He lived in California during the years 1980 -1987, studied painting and film-making at the California College of Arts and Crafts, in Oakland between (1980-1983). He had several shows in New York, California and Paris. He returned to Turkey in 1987 and has been living in Istanbul since. Baykam has had 125 one-man-shows in various countries in addition to participating to numerous group shows.

One of his most well-known books, “Monkeys’ Right to Paint” published in Turkish and English, brings to light the rights of non western artists and severely criticizes the one sided prejudiced attitude of the western art establishment that he accuses building a one sided, all western art-history. Baykam is also the writer of a controversial bestseller “The Bone”, published in December 2000.

A turn of the Century novel around sex, death, philosophy new sciences, technology and spying, “The Bone” predicted the events of September 11, ten months before it happened in all its details! “The Bone” has been published English in 2005, and in Italian in 2007. Baykam is one of the pioneers of the New-Expressionism movement and of multi-media and photo-painting oriented political art.

Since the beginning of the 80’s, he directed several 16 mm. short films and videos and acted in several parts in feature films in Turkey as an actor. Bedri Baykam is also the author of 23 published books.

BLECKNER ROSS

 For further information please contact the gallery.

BRANTLEY HEBRU                                                     

Hebru Brantley was born 1981 in Bronzeville, Chicago, afro-american area south of Chicago, where he still lives and works. After graduating from Atlanta Clark University with a B.A. in Design and Press Illustration he returned to his hometown Bronzeville. His work is largely inspired by personal memories , as well elements from the culture in fashion,  mainly related to themes from the eighties to nowadays. Hebru uses in his work a large variety of surfaces and techniques, such as wood, spray paint, coffee or even tea, expressing his concern for social and political issues with a playful perspicacity that is nonetheless a message of hope to his own generation.
Hebru’s inspiration comes from the icons of the pop culture, the heros of comics and japanese mangas. Also the pioneers of Street Art such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring play an important role in his work. At present the artist mixes in his paintings scenes of everyday life, personal experiences and fantastic fiction thus creating a fragmented, funny and nearly childish environment that intriguates the viewer. Spray paint is used more often then other mediums, enabeling the artist to add a critical side to the frivolity of the fantasy world of comics.

Hebru Brantley created his own personal style known as afro-futurism. Hebru Brantley’s work is attracting the growing attention of the public and the art critics and his name is gaining recognition in the international art scene, also through his installations and public works exhibited  in Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Miami, Seattle, Los Angeles and New York. He was awarded recently the Redbull Curates Chicago award amid others and was invited by Scope Miami and the tv channel VH1 during the Art Basel Miami  week in 2013. The US magazine Elite Daily rated him « Most Influential Artist Of The Year » in 2013 and big brands like Adidas, Nike and Skyy Vodka have commissioned works . He was also the 2013 ambassador for the watch company Hublot and Ferrari  in the United States.

Future projects include a limited sneaker edition for Jordan Brand in 2015, after realising a big wall for the Soho House Chicago and the big project The Watch. The concept of “The Watch” is to introduce people to the public realm of art by taking down the walls of the gallery and opening them up to the community and to the world giving vibrancy and identity to public arts initiatives. 

CHAMBERS STEPHEN 

Beautiful and Wicked: The Paintings of Stephen Chambers

Stephen Chambers’ paintings are difficult to put into words – though curiously when I think of them they seem as half-understood narratives whose meanings I have somehow forgotten or failed to ascertain. Looking at them one is drawn across to somewhere that is quite dark – like a dreamer who knows he is dreaming and, though fearful, will let the dream unfold out of curiosity. They hint at the knowingness of the inanimate. They are painted with what I can only describe as tenderness.

Away from the physicality of the work, ‘rememberings’ are important and they accumulate to change the images, yet the memories I carry in my mind are never quite what they have seemed when faced with the reality of the paintings again. From the other direction – seeing them for the first time some of these images provoke a sense of recognition – but of what I am not certain

I know that I felt this recognition seeing Orson Welles (1997) in the exhibition Silent Running, but I had to go back to the picture to understand its peculiarity. To see the strangeness of the form made by the blackish, abstract shape which cuts off the figure at the neck denying it a straight-forward representational reading. To see that the background, almost metallic in the colour of the underpainting, was in fact painted last – as foreground and encroaches over the head, ‘meddling’ with the face, forcing one to see the image as ‘faulted’.

The initial sensation of the painting is of the kind of formality of a traditional Japanese print and yet the insistence of the dark shape (sliding again out of the picture plain), itself interrupted by rods of orange which jangle and disrupt the space within the shape, makes me think of recent paintings by Gary Hume in a much more contemporary referencing. Many of the more recent images have this kind of pictorial ‘starkness’ where a single figure or groups are isolated by different devices within the space of the canvas and must be read abstractly and figuratively in the same moment.

These figures are not without power – there is a violence implicit in the eyes and in the gesticulating limbs, but if one looks closer one sees that they are all literally ‘pinned’ into the painted image. Dots swarm towards eyes and around bodies, pointed shafts of colour tear into the backgrounds, bearing down upon and transfixing the inhabitants of these paintings. These figures are not human, and like the displaced objects in earlier works, they are trapped in some kind of circumstantial continuum. One strains to hear their whispering – but they have no mouths with which to speak. In trying to understand why this work affects me as it does – and it does deeply – I have come to realise how resistant Chambers’ art is to any kind of linear analysis – words constrict resonance and one cannot divorce the meanings of these images from their physical manifestations. The subtle forebodings, the sense of arrival at places one has not been but which one recognises – these sensations come not simply from the image, but from somewhere within the paintings themselves and it is as if by making one completely aware of the ‘skin’ of the painting that Chambers reveals what is underneath as somehow palpable.

These paintings exist paradoxically, in the sense that they are emphatically present as sensual objects yet redolent with hints and suggestions of subjective purposes, which inform the object but are literally absent (in the narrative sense) in the image. In one way Chambers’ images form a pretext for making artworks which operate on two levels simultaneously: their presence as objects disrupt their possible meanings and it is this which forces the viewer into a relationship with the work which is one not only of interpretation but also one of experiencing. Chambers is articulate about the influences upon his work and provides a paper trial of seemingly random but utterly plausible visual images in answer to some of my questions – but the ultimate meanings of these paintings seem as elusive to him as they are to those coming upon them. Film informs Chambers’ paintings on a number of levels: it is a time-based medium, which creates its own logic, controlling not only the information given to the viewer, but also when it is given. It is a medium which can underline the sense of the viewer as voyeur, isolated in darkness, subject at one to the images on the screen but secret in the thoughts that these images provoke.

Hysterical, a video projection made by Douglas Gordon in 1995, showed sequences of the same black and white silent film, playing at slightly different speeds. Two male figures in old-fashioned clothes bend over a woman sitting on a bed in seemingly amiable conversation until the woman suddenly throws herself about, apparently wailing and renting her hair. The men restrain her back down onto the bed and the scenario takes on an appalling sense of farce as the woman, fighting to rise, is bounced up and down by the bed springs. The repetition and the alteration that occurs when looking from one enactment of this bizarre drama to another, forces in question after question. What are we looking at? Is this film old footage of a real event? Is the woman insane? Are the men her doctors or her torturers? Has the artist contrived the whole work with actors? It is in the tiny, jarring details and in the sly, dark humour which plays across the work provoking silent anxieties, that I find parallels with Chambers’ images. These works entice you in and yet their effect is one of estrangement.

If Stephen Chambers’ paintings can be described as depicting states of mind it would imply that on some level they are profoundly autobiographical. They are complex paintings, beautiful and wicked. They show longings and misapprehensions. Like fairy tales they lead you in with deceptive simplicity. In the particular vision of reality Chambers shows us we must see with the eyes of a child, for whom the world is timeless and everything is always in the present.

Emma Hill 

DOGAN ISMET 

"I see everything through the mirror."    

İsmet Doğan was born in 1957 in Adiyaman (Turkey). He graduated from Marmara University, Faculty of Fine Arts in Istanbul in 1983. In 1987 he received a French Government Scholarship in Paris where he spent two years. In the 1980s, under the influence of Dadaism, İsmet Doğan created collage, graffiti, and assemblage used ready-mades and works on the problematic of culture, tradition and history by plastic means. As a thinker his attention was drawn by the aspects of violence and trauma, especially during the century of westernization and modernization in Turkey. He approached to modern cultural phenomenon reactively and critically.

By introducing Latin letters for instance into his art, Doğan revealed the language reform in Turkey in the beginning of the 20th century as a political vehicle of a social engineering which subsequently caused the nation an alienation from its own culture. Thus seeing in this a violent political act which resulted in trauma. In terms of Doğan’s critics of modernism, written letters assembled to words (as Logos or Ba^Ba) or scattered randomly over the canvas stay an essential component of his oeuvre till today.

In 1990s, after receiving the French Government Scholarship, he did not intent to stay in Paris but returned to his native country and resided in Istanbul.     Here an installation as a form of realization of his artwork assumed ever greater importance for Doğan’s art practice. “What I am trying to do as an artist is a sort of intervention or modification of the existing visuality” - so Ismet Doğan. In 2000s he integrated another critical dimension into his artwork; especially interested on the subject of colonialism he approached a strategy of art historical references and cinematographic material alteration.      

Doğan undertakes a change by integration of his own image into the filmstrip commenting thus on the identification and empathy with movie characters and at the same time on the hegemony of western visual culture. On the other hand the movie material gaines thus a status of an art motif. A mirror has one of the most essential roles as a working material for Doğan. In the half-matt or transparent, convex and concave mirrors the viewer is reflected, multiplied, and confronted with his own body as a stranger and even more, operating as something else, namely as a part of an artwork.

Recent projects: Eat Me (2012), All is External (2011), Close Up (2008), Penetratum (2006). Neither inside nor outside my body (2006) presenting photography, painting, sculpture, video, and installation. Ismet Dogan lives and works in Istanbul.  

 EDALATKHAH HOSSEIN

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ERBIL DEVRIM 

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FULLA JORDI

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 HUNDERTWASSER FRIEDENSREIGH

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JENQUINS PAUL

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JONES ALLEN 

The art of Allen Jones is an extended meditation on the roles we play. How do we situ- ate ourselves in the world? What constitutes personality? Jones catalogues the ways in which people deal with the threat of extinc- tion: strategies for survival in the mad dance of life, with the chance of some fun along the way. This is no detached scientific analysis, but a vibrant dialogue, full of wit and humour. Allen Jones is fortunate in his versatility, able to turn with equal skill from oil painting to sculpture, then back to watercolour, print-making or drawing. The variousness of medium does not undermine the impact of his work, for the consistency of his aims and subject provides an essential continuity. And in a very real sense, we (the audience) make his meaning.


Jones likes to tease his viewers visually, as well as thematically. The line created by the edge of a steel plate will – in the active pro- cess of describing a shape – move around a sculpture, appearing almost disembodied, before transforming into a plane, which in turn will box-in a form with suggested volume, before moving out into a line again. It’s as if the artist practises sleight-of-hand, yet the effects are optical, not intentionally deceptive. As Jones himself says, the work “moves in and out of statement”. The sculpture Artisan is organized around such a space-driven dynamic, created from an avalanche of momentum, all sharp profiles and open curves. Free Spirit is one long tipsy inverted exclamation mark, joyous in its celebration, in its freedom from thought or responsibility. But how far does the free spirit go? Jones creates in this sculpture a cont- emporary clerk out on a spree, taking himself none too seriously, but nevertheless still dressed in the proper uniform of tie and hat. Which is truer to the man? Is the irresponsibi- lity skin-deep only, or the uniform? Allen Jones rings the changes between rebel and establishment figure. In his own career, he is still an enfant terrible to many feminists, while at the same time managing to be a prominent member of the Royal Academy of Arts in London. He thrives on contradictions and embraces polarities. In his art, he is both outsider and conformist, and his imagery tellingly reflects this.

Jones depicts people not just in movement but in apparent dissolution. He paints figures with a fluidity of parts, as if their bodies and by extension their personalities and identities – are seen through a kaleidoscope. As we are increasingly aware, there is no such entity as the stable psyche. By painting a part-figure, Allen Jones creates a power-

ful metaphor for the fragmented self. Aside from that, and in painterly terms, here is a demonstration of Jones’s formal inventive- ness and virtuosity: he can summon a body from such minimal resources as a plinth, a spike and a swirl or two. He is, above all, a maker of images, of objects with pronoun- ced physical presence which bring aesthetic pleasure as well as conveying an intellectual message. His fondness for the incomplete and fragmentary reflects one of the key sig- natures of Modernism, which he then gives a contemporary spin.

As a painter in love with his art, he is deeply concerned with the nature of appearances, and has made magicians and performers integral figures in his corps of essential hu- man types. The magician constantly deals in sleight of hand and bends appearances in the interests of his act. He practises in direction in order to mislead us so that we don’t notice what he is really doing an interesting metaphor for the artist. Likewise the performer who puts on a public face that may be entirely different from the private person. This is wittily suggested by the re- vealing dress in Ovation. The audience sees only what it is allowed to see: the mask and the projected surface. We, back stage or behind the scenes, are privileged to witness the girl’s delicious semi-nudity. Viewers of this painting are left wondering: will the curtain come down, or will she turn around and walk away? What will the audience get to see? Jones is a great speculator in what can and what cannot be revealed.

The peak of kaleidoscopic fracturing comes of course in Cubism, a movement long of interest to Jones, and to which he makes constant reference in his own work. Look at Red Head, for instance, a challenging in- vestigation of different aspects of the female head, a visual catalogue comparing different facets, turning through 360 degrees in an enquiry into the planar and the volumetric  the stuff of art and the meaning of personali- ty. Equally extreme is Screen Showtime, one of his most original and challenging works of recent years, a little like a giant breastplate or piece of body armour. This is the most minimal and yet perhaps the most suggestive and sensual exhibit here: a long wavy red screen of glass-reinforced composite lined with leather, depicting a dancing girl. Only her outstretched arm confirms her actual pre- sence in this sexy, undulating form. A master  piece of suggestion.

Allen Jones registers the worrying instability of identity when people are brought together the fact that they become more alike, adapting to each other’s habits and rituals, adopting common patterns of behaviour lar- gely out of the desire to survive by blending in. How to define self? Surely not through others. It is telling the way bodies in many of Jones’s pictures and sculptures seek to merge, to return to the ancient Platonic unit, long sin- ce sundered; we all seek our other half. The sculptures in particular speak of the mutability of appearance, of how different the same people can look from different angles. Jones also manages to suggest the interrelations- hips of individuals through his manipulation of form: look at how the couples merge and emerge in a complex dance in his lovely painted wood sculptures, Little Echo and Little Prima Donna. The work taken as a whole is less about pictorial illusion and more con- cerned with the fundamental instability of reality. Jones is a conceptual artist, something of a philosopher enough to know not toproffer an easy solution. Art is there to help us make sense of life, to bring solace as well as to entertain. Thankfully, it goes beyond rationality.

Andrew Lambirth

MORRIS LOUIS 

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MA DESHENG                                          

Chinese artist born in 1952 in Beijing, Ma Desheng is a self-taught artist who began his career as an industrial designer and engraver. He quickly changes his affection to traditional chinese calligraphy and poetry, but never mixes both worlds, since in his opinion they are much to different.

He nevertheless realizes after a while that chinese calligraphy, with its strict codes, leaves him little space to express his true emotions. This search for individual expression is one of the founding principles of the XingXing (The Stars) group, first post Mao critical art movement, of which Ma Desheng is one of the leading figures. To get attention they hang illegally 150 works of 23 different artists outside of the national fine-arts Museum of Beijing. A “violent” action, which nevertheless will lead to the recognition of the art movement by the chinese press the following year.

Within the group are artists of such renomee as Li Shuang, Huang Rui, Wan Keping and Ai WeiWei. XingXing will be the first intellectual art movement to point out the importance of the individual in the general society and as such is quickly under rouge critique from the press and the general public, as the artistic message is seen as a pretext for a political message.

This pressure and the lack of interest in the artistic message will force many artists of the movement to leave the country. Leaving the country and the personal changes that come with such a rupture will cause the last definite argument for Ma to radically change his paintings. He turns his back to calligraphy and coded art and discovers the world of the abstract. Finally free of this burden he starts using distortion of shapes to give the human body, especially the female body a more eternal even celestial shape, the stone. Like his vision of the world stones are solitary, but build of many different layers and lived experiences through time, before becoming part of the never ending cosmos. Stones are, as humans at first sight strong, stable and full of energy, but actually witnesses of life, made of earthly material and in constant instability. Ma’s paintings, his stones, which resemble an abstract body, are a witness of his adoration of the shapes and materials of the rock and finally his love for the mountain, leading to his desire for a cosmic connection, a search for a cosmic spiritually. His technique shows this duality, Ma mixes color pigments with plaster, which gives his paintings a certain structure, sculpted paintings. Focusing on the eternal motif he is looking for leads to the vain of the landscape in his works, hence it would only compose a visual distraction and be in contrast to his fundamental thought: the place of the individual in the big cosmos.

Ma Desheng is the founder of the seminal Stars Group, the first major art movement to appear in China after Mao died and the Cultural Revolution ended. The breakthrough group included the young Ai Weiwei, Wang Keping, Huang Rui among other rebel artists who dared to jettison the official, propagandistic style of Socialist Realism, in order to express themselves in free flowing individual styles that involved using the then prohibited forms of abstraction in their works. In 1979 they held the first exhibition illegally, hanging their work on the fence outside Beijing's National Art Museum, only to have the show shut down by the authorities.

Ma Desheng lead a protest march from "Democracy Wall" to the Communist Party municipal building and is famous for the radical speech he gave calling for freedom. After the Democracy movement was crushed, he emigrated first to Lausanne, and now lives in Paris.

MIGUEL ANGEL PASCUAL

In 1984, he moved with his family to Brazil, living between Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. He lived also in Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1989-90., and in Canary Islands (Tenerife & Gran Canaria) from 1990 to 1997. In 2000, Miguel Angel Pascual founded a group of artists called “La Reina 39” and started making as a curator in project exhibitons in Madrid during ARCO International Art Fair.

Nowadays he lives and works in Barcelona, and spends few months a year working in Berlin. He has made solo exhibitons in different galleries in Spain (Ferran Cano Gallery, Palma de Mallorca & Barcelona, Carmen de la Guerra Gallery, Madrid, Manuel Ojeda Gallery, Gran Canaria
) and some group shows in museums like Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid; MU:DAC Lausanne CAAM Centro Atllantico de Arte Moderno, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Tecla Sala, Barcelona, Glogauer Gallery, Barlin, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Tenerife.

OLEINIKOV IGOR 

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PASQUA PHILIPPE

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PERCIN BURCU 

Born in Anakara in 1979, Burcu Perçin graduated from the Department of Painting at Mimar Sinan University in 2002. Producing works using mainly oil-on-canvas technique, Perçin focuses on spaces. These spaces are an outcome of the compositions found in the photographs Perçin shoots in abandoned places she discovers.

Perçin depicts the industrial areas she focuses on with a unique technique characterized with pronounced and lively brush strokes. We come across with the spaces and objects in Perçin’s photos in forms of various collages she later designs along the process of production.

Combining spaces like industrial zones, factories, depots, dockyards among others. Sometimes with objects found in these spaces or with objects and images she finds elsewhere, Perçin designs a new composition and narrates these reinterpreted photo-collages on canvas.

In her latest productions, we find graffiti as a recently included component. Drawing attention towards forgotten places, Perçin questions the memory attributed to the space. However, the graffiti on the paintings implies that these spaces are still being used and that some traces are subtly left around. Standing out with her works on canvas, Perçin also produces photo-prints intervened with photographs, collages and paint.

PICABIA FRANCIS 

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QU   LEI LEI   


by Michael Sullivan                          

The American art historian and critic Bernard Berenson famously declared that one of the essential element in painting was what he called “tactile values”. By contrast with the Renaissance arts he so much admired, Oriental painting he felt lacked that quality and as a result, as he put it, “the arts of the Orient soon weary”.
What would he have thought of the work of Qu Leilei? Most probably he would have said that it was not Chinese, merely an attempt to imitate Western art. But were he alive today — he died in 1959 — he might see things differently. For Chinese art has undergone profound changes in recent decades, as Chinese artists have taken from Western art what they needed for their own purposes. This process is not new. It began soon after the Revolution of 1911, when artists of the Lingnan School heard about Western art in Japan and attempted, following the Japanese, to adapt their own tradition to take account of new forms and technique.

What, then, is so special about Qu Leilei? Three things, I feel, mark him out. The first is sheer talent. As a painter and draftsman, there is nothing he cannot do. Surely the human hand is one of the most difficult things to draw; but not only does he draws hands beautifully; he makes of them a powerful image expressive of thoughts, feelings, humanity, and love. The second thing, is that  while some of the most successful modern Chinese artists, having achieved a popular style or subject-matter, keep on repeating themselves,   Qu Leilei, when he has fully explored the possibilities of one form, or subject, moves on to explore another. So he has never stayed still for long. From his first naïve work  in the 1979 and 1980 Beijing exhibitions of the radical Stars, of which he was one of the youngest members, he has moved on to develop one theme after another, culminating in the splendid paintings in the Hands series, and the striking  large-scale  portraits Everyone’s Life is an Epic, which combined brilliant brush and ink technique with sympathetic insight into the character of the subject.  And now—the nudes.

REVEMAN FRIEDERIKE 

Born in 1984 in Germany, Friederike Reveman studied at the Academy for Visual Arts in Leipzig before graduating with a Masters at the New York Academy of Art. Her large scale paintings are strange portraits, weird landscapes, twisted spaces born out of the clash between social cultural ideals of beauty and the imagination and personal souvenirs of the artist. Reveman’s work bothers the viewer, he cannot stay indifferent.

It is the very own quest of the artist on the complex mechanism of mass media and pop culture, questioning the idealization of perfection and beauty and the way this leads nowadays to serious social issues. Reveman’s paintings depict a fake race of female figures living in a world where everything is bright and yet uncertain. The figures are wowanly but at the same time very childish, often naked, fidgeting in a revealing, at times violent way.

The environment is usually overcrowded and quite often they seem to be locked in a structure that looks like a theater scene or a play cage. This imaginary world, pure fantasy of the artist’s mind, enables her to analyze and question the disturbing way in which women and children see themselves and their surroundings in today’s world.

CHRISTIAN ROHLFS

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 RONG REN

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SALUSTIANO

Born in Sevilla, Spain, 1965

Specialization on Painting at Fine Arts
University of Seville, Spain

Salustiano succeeds in eliminating any reference to time or place in his works, leaving the crimson youth to speak for themselves. This results in paintings that do not remind the viewer of anything, essentially leaving one without any anchor or cognitive framework with which to label them. The remoteness of the visages that seem to float in an endless landscape of burgundy, white or black mean that Salustiano’s works simply convey the emotions of those looking at them, never the emotions of the artist himself. The viewer projects his or her own lived experiences onto the painted faces, faces that sometimes portray a severeness, sometimes a remoteness, but always an irony within the lifelike eyes.

The work of this artist begins when he photographs the model. Although he usually does not talk much to them, there is always a complicity: “You realise that it’s not just a serene or beautiful face, they are very special people, and curiously many of them are related to music”.

All this self-interpretation is not to say, however, that Salustiano can in any way be categorized as an abstract artist. Instead, for every torso stripped of external meaning, there is a quaint smile that hearkens back to classicism or a pair of cupid bow lips reminiscent of the Renaissance.

RECENT EXHIBITIONS

2012

ART STAGE SINGAPORE. Galerie Frank Pages Baden-Baden, Germany
SOLO-SHOW.
Leonhard Ruethmueller Gallery. Basel, Switzerland
SOLO-SHOW. Cor Galerie. Zurich, Switzerland
Scope Art Fair. Galerie Brockstedt. Basel, Switzerland
ScopeBasel, Switzerland with Galerie Frank Pages
SOLO SHOW.
Galerie Brockstedt. Berlin, Germany
ART KARLSRUHE. Galerie Frank Pages Karlsruhe, Germany
ART KARLSRUHE.
Obrist Galerie. Karlsruhe, Germany
Art Wynwood Art Fair. Miami. USA
THE TWELFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS. Apama Mackey Gallery. Houston, USA
CONTEMPORARY ISTANBUL. Galerie Frank Pages and Galerie Brockstedt, Istanbul, Turkey

2011

THE MISSING PEACE. San Antonio Museum of Art. San Antonio, Texas. USA
PULSE ART FAIR. Kavachnina Contemporary. Los Angeles, USA
PALM BEACH CONT. ART FAIR. Kavachnina Contemporary. Palm Beach, USA
Contemporary Alternative I. Kavachnina Contemporary. Miami. USA
BLACK. Solo-show. Kavachnina Contemporary. Miami, USA
Contemporary Alternative II. Kavachnina Contemporary. Miami, USA
THE MISSING PEACE. Santa Clara University. Santa Clara, California, USA
I WAS THERE. Frederic Boloix Gallery. Sun Valley, USA
ART BY GENÈVE. Leonhard Ruethmueller Gallery. Geneva, Switzerland
Kunst 11 ZĂŒrich International Contemporary Art Fair.
Cor Galerie. Zurich, Switzerland
FRENTE A FRENTE: DAS SPANISCHE PORTRAIT.
100 Kubik Galerie. Cologne, Germany
I WAS THERE. 100 Kubik Galerie. Cologne, Germany
ART KARLSRUHE. Leonhard Ruethmueller Gallery. Karlsruhe, Germany

 

SHMOEGNER WALTER

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SEOCK SON 

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SOULAGES PIERRE

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 TEH-CHUN CHU

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VALLRIVERA JOSEP 

Was born in 1937 in Juneda (Lleida), Catalonia, Spain, during the spanish civil war, the son of a photographer from Barcelona and a farmer's daughter from Juneda, he attended the AcademĂ­a Catalunya, a private high school, where Josep Vallribera was also given drawing lessons., his father preferred to retreat with his Family to the island of Eivissa (Ibiza).Josep Vallribera was 14 years old at that time. He was now attending the high school on Eivissa. At the age of 18, he enlisted voluntarily in the armed forces in order to finish early and thus be able to complete additional training at the photography school Schwerer in Hamburg.

SinceJosep Vallribera had already received very good training in photography from his father, the school in Hamburg did not give him what he was looking for. He used the time mainly to work as a free-lance photographer and do photographic laboratory work in order to increase his pocket-money. In 1963, Josep Vallribera returned to Eivissa where he opened the "GalerĂ­a GrĂĄfica". At the same time, He continued to make photographs and paintings, which were presented for the first time in 1966 under the title "Arte Figurativo en Ibiza" as a part of an exhibition touring through europe. At this time, Eivissa was an artists' refuge.

It was a meeting-oasis for all kinds of international artists such as the members of the grupo el Paso: Viola, Saura, Emilio Vedova, Corneille (Cobra Group), Heinz Tröckes, Orson Welles, Françesc Parserisas, E. Broner, the architect Sert as well as many others. Together with his father, he opened in 1967 the "Galería Vallribera" and in 1969 "The Inside Out Art Galery" with the french artist M. Macréau's pieces of art. He concentrated to an ever increasing extent on improving his own art. In 1984, Josep Vallribera decided to move back to Spain; this time, however, to the mediterranean coast. Since 1998 Vallribera works and lives in La Pobla de Benifasse (Castello).

His work is was shown among others, in the Ludwigmuseum Koblenz, the Musee Fabregat, Museum der Stadt Wiener Neustadt, Landesmueseum Tirol.

WAKULTSCHICK MAXIM 

Born in Byelorussia in 1973, Maxim Wakultschik lives and works in Dusseldorf, Germany, where he studied at the Dusseldorf Art Academy under Beate Schiff and Janis Kounellis. His paintings, objects, and installations employ figurative images which are multifaceted and dynamic in process. Wakultschik’s work mainly deals with technics pushing the boundaries of classical painting, thus widening the limit of painting into an object.

In his realistic way of painting, the work becomes a three-dimensional conceptual object by means of techniques and materials. The artist uses classical materials like canvas, oil or acrylic but also wood, metal, paper and plexiglass. One of Wakultschick’s main theme are faces, represented as paintings, objects or reliefs. They are often famous faces, from the glamour world or chosen artists but they can also just be no-names.

WOU KI ZAO 

Zao's works, influenced by Paul Klee, are orientated to abstraction. He names them with the date in which he finishes them, and in them, masses of colours appear to materialise a creating world, like a big bang, where light structures the canvas.

He worked formats in triptychs and diptychs. While his work was stylistically similar to theAbstract Expressionists whom he met while travelling in New York, he was influenced by Impressionism. Zao Wou-ki stated that he had been influenced by the works ofMatisse, Picasso and Cézanne.

His meetings with Henri Michaux pushed him to review his Indian ink techniques, always based in Chinese traditional drawings. Zao was a member of the Académie des beaux-arts, and was considered to have been one of the most successful Chinese painters during his lifetime.

ZUNIGA FRANCISCO 

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PHOTOGRAPHY

BARILLA 

 For further information please contact the gallery.

CORREA MIGUEL

Miguel Correa was born in New York and educated in Switzerland. At the age of 16 he received his first camera and was soon devoting most of his time to photography.

By his early twenties he had worked as a professional photographer in Europe and moved to New York where he was an assistant to Hiro and then Richard Avedon. During the next ten years his photographs appeared in Vogue, and other leading fashion magazines.

In the eighties, Correa changed careers and later returned to his first love, photography. His photographs combine technical play, dramatic composition and a painterly style to create evocative images that are simultaneously real and otherworldly.

DASHTI GOHAR

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DE LUCA GIANMARIA

Gianmaria De Luca was born in Rome, Italy and began experimenting with photography from an early age.  His fervour earned him professional work and later an internship at Buggionovi’s Fotogramma 24 print studio. Here he crossed paths with Claudio Abate, assisting him on cultural projects for the British, American and French Academies in Rome. The experience would inspire him to work with artists in the coming years.

Gianmaria continued with personal projects and participated in competitions. This brought him to the ISFCI (Institute of Photography and Integrated Communication) where began to work and study photography avidly following the classes of Claudio Palmisano and the workshops of Francesco Zizola on Ethics in Photojournalism. His artistic projects to date have included notable works and collaborations with well known artists, experimental installations and more recently journalistic reportage.

His work has been exhibited globally throughout Italy, Northern Ireland, Germany, Switzerland and Australia.

DIAMOND JAMIE  (USA)

« Mother Love »

Jamie Diamond, nĂ©e en 1983, photographe basĂ©e Ă  New York, est diplomĂ©e de l’UniversitĂ© de Pennsylvania et de Wisconsin, professeur de photographie Ă  l’UniversitĂ© de Wisconsin, explore dans son travail la relation entre fiction et rĂ©alitĂ©, les moyens d’échange, l’intimitĂ© et la perception.

Dans sa derniĂšre sĂ©rie de travaux, « Mother Love », Jamie Diamond analyse le jeu de rĂŽles de la maternitĂ©. En 2010 elle dĂ©couvre le Reborning  en tombant  sur EBay sur des poupĂ©es hyperrĂ©alistes vendues Ă  des prix exorbitants. Elle en achĂšte une et c’est le dĂ©but de son nouveau projet.

Le « Reborning »(renaissance, renaitre), subculture contemporaine amĂ©ricaine, implique la crĂ©ation de poupĂ©es hyperrĂ©alistes dont on prend soin comme si c’était de vrais bĂ©bĂ©s ! Les « reborners », crĂ©ateurs des poupĂ©es, vendent leurs Ɠuvres Ă  des collectionneurs qui « adoptent » la poupĂ©e, qui aura sa propre nurserie Ă  la maison, retrouvent d’autres collectionneurs lors de rĂ©unions, d’anniversaires et de « baby-showers ». Le fondement de cette subculture est un jeu de rĂŽles, les participantes jouent Ă  la mĂšre parfaite et altruiste, la poupĂ©e est le totem. Jamie a Ă©tĂ© fascinĂ©e par cette fiction, par la communautĂ© qui en est issue et afin de mieux comprendre les motifs de ces femmes, elle devient « reborner » professionnelle. Pendant  deux ans elle suit des cours, assiste Ă  des rĂ©unions, apprend et surtout elle les photographie.

Dans « Neuf mois de Reborning », elle crĂ©e ses propres bĂ©bĂ©s, ainsi qu’une vraie nurserie, nommĂ©e « The Bitten Apple », dans son studio et elle les propose Ă  l’adoption sur EBay. Pour son projet Amy, elle collabore avec huit cĂ©lĂ©britĂ©s de la scĂšne, leur demandant d’interprĂ©ter et d’idĂ©aliser la mĂȘme poupĂ©e selon leurs propres critĂšres. Le bĂ©bĂ© final est photographiĂ© dans une  pose trĂšs vieille Ă©cole, sur une toile de fond des annĂ©es 80, puis rendu Ă  son crĂ©ateur et vendu sur EBay. Son travail avec la communautĂ© des Reborner lui a permis d’explorer la zone grise comprise entre rĂ©alitĂ© et fiction, oĂč un lien affectif se tisse avec un objet inanimĂ©, entre la personne et la poupĂ©e, entre l’artiste et son Ɠuvre, monde Ă©trange et rĂ©el Ă  la fois. Au cours des trois annĂ©es consacrĂ©es Ă  ce projet, Jamie a Ă©tĂ© fascinĂ©e par la fiction, l’interprĂ©tation et les rĂ©alisations artistiques incroyables de cet univers de fantaisie.

EDMOND LOUIS VINCENT

Born in Nimes, France, Vincent Edmond Louis attended Central Saint Martins College of Art in London, England from which he received an unconditional offer.

Having pursued photography from a very young age, Vincent has constantly tackled various ways of pushing the boundaries of what we have come to consider traditional Fine Art Photography. Katelijne de Backer (Armory, Scope, Lehmann Maupin) has actually named this technique “Photography Revisited”. Whether he adds paint to enhance the image or remove the subject matter, recounts his memories by simply writing on the photograph, depicts the passing of time by tearing up and putting back together portraits, or manipulating an image to create larger-than-life installation, Vincent is continuously seeking to add a multitude of layers to the otherwise twodimensional medium.

Hence allowing the viewer to participate in the work. When lacking subject material Vincent can be found in his studio reviving discarded everyday objects and giving them a new life as art work. Always keeping an open mind, Vincent continuously searches for new frontiers, travelling the world to gain an insight into foreign cultures and documenting characters from different backgrounds and styles.

The viewer is invited to discover an unknown world, where the image is placed in a new setting, thus makes you use your imagination. Vincent Edmond Louis has exhibited in New York, Paris, London, Stockholm, New Delhi, Monaco, Miami, Gothenburg, Bogota, Istanbul, Geneva, Baden- Baden, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Crans-Montana and Zurich.

GUNYELI MEHMET 

Mehmet Gunyeli’s body of black and white photographs, reduced to outline the Darvish dancers, haunt everyone who views them. His series Dervishers / Beliefs’ Dancing, executed in 2007, presents stylised compositions of the Dervish dance and has already attracted a lot of attention from critics and gallerists. Gunyeli contrasts this 13th century cultural inheritance, with the global mass culture that overpowers the world today. 
Born in Turkey, Gunyeli has often indulged his curiosity for other communities and before he embanked on the subject of Dervish dance, the artist produced a series titled The Colours of Earth, and Mystery of East, reflecting on the vivid and lucid colors of the Indian subcontinent. In 2006 these photographs were combined in a book titled quite simply, India. Previously his photographic account of travel in Cuba was edited into the book Viva Cuba Libre (2005). In both expeditions GĂŒnyeli records the daily lives of people from different continents in their own habitual and ethnic environments. His work contains meaningful contrast, created through his use of close-up portraits, which offer an intimate taste of the culture, while his use of the wider lense suggests a perspective of alienation.

A man of many talents and aspirations, Gunyeli touches people’s heart through his unique depiction of the Dervish dance. His world perspective shines through his art with a vision that makes it simultaneously recognisable yet abstract, distant yet intimate.
Among others his works are exhibited at Istanbul Modern Museum, Houston Museum of Fine Art, Borusan Contemporary and the Elgiz museum 

HELD SUZANNE

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LAURENCE ET RENAUD

Born in France in 1969 and 1966, Laurence Guille and Renaud Loisy did their graphic art studies in Paris. They met in 1990. They worked as photographers and producers for several advertisement agencies and won many prices in the field of communication. In 2000, they decided to collaborate more closely together and sign their creations under one only name, “Laurence et Renaud”. In 2005, they presented their work at the gallery of art Frank Pagùs, who represents them at the moment. From 2008, they lived in Normandy in France where they pursue their photographic researches, which is a constant quest of essentials by working on sober aesthetics, without artifices.

Lunch Break (portraits/ still live)
“We worked on what seemed to be essential for us: the man can live because he feeds himself. This simple assessment allowed us to highlight the immersion of the human into the consumption society. To live, he must eat and to eat, he must work. We treated this subject in an extremely simple way without any kind of artifices, using only the stylization proposed by our subjects, in order to fix an image of the occidental man into the society of consumption. The aestheticisms of the lunches (packaging, plastic, blister pack) testify of the world: everything is proportioned, uniform, industrialised. The expression of the persons is almost empty of felling, the packaging or envelope hiding the emotion or evidence of a true absence of free will? Though, everything seems reassuring and peaceful.”

Red Alert: “For this series, we needed a scenery of wild nature, worn out of any sign of human presence. The airplanes are fixed in their movement, hanging into the air and time without any physic contact with the landscape. We opposed two elements to perfect beauty: the nature and the human genius represented by an ultra sophisticated machine conceived for destruction. We have followed this experience by integrating other elements symptomatic of the duality between man and nature; a phone box, missiles, cannons
 We have treated all these integrations like the two worlds could not interpenetrate each other. This idea is strengthened by the absence of structure or access way, which gives us a profound feeling of isolation, that doesn’t put the man facing his biotope but puts him face to face with himself, to his own reflection about the world he’s living in.”

Les Zeppelins: “In this images wanted as they were marines, we wished to stop the time by awakening an incredible machine, to the slow and silent moving. Les zeppelins float in a frame of fullness; it’s the balance of weightlessness. Like flying cetacean, they invite us to a reflection about serenity, about the man facing his choices, about a meeting between man and nature almost ideal, harmonious and brought back together that would help us to leave the shores for some mysterious trips.”

The meat islands: “This series is a double trigger. We found funny to assess how that the shape of a steak put on a plate can look like an island. A new world just emerged in our kitchen
after the sandwiches islands, the meat islands existed finally
to better interrogate us on our common destiny. What represents the planet for humanity?

The shapes: “This series is inspired from the novels of Ray Bradbury “The Martian chronicles”. By imagining what could have been an intelligent life on another planet, we noticed that just our own emotions became materialised under the appearance of undefined shapes. Not being human, not animal, not vegetal, though they’re really alive, and evolve in their own world, questioning themselves maybe, also about their place in the universe.

LERICHE DANY

Dany Leriche and Jean Michel Fickinger live and work in France. Their artistic collaboration was born at the same time of their first meeting, 20 years ago. From the start, they have provided us with a second reading of the image of women in the history of Western painting. Today, they travel throughout Africa, drawn by the mysteries of certain customs that have survived the passage of time, and lead research on those spiritual minorities that show resistance to globalization and scientific materialism.

In the long term, their work consists of exploring the source of different cultures, particularly as they question the interactions between identity and ceremonies for the sacred.   Leriche and Fickinger show their work in galleries and museums as well as in cultural centers in France and abroad, including Korea, Brazil and Canada.

They have been recognized with the Villa MĂ©dicis Hors les Murs in 2006 for their work in Mali, an artist residency at the Sacatar Institute in Brazil in 2009, and the Mention spĂ©ciale du jury of the Prix Scam Roger Pic in 2011 for their seriesChasseurs de l’invisible. 

Dany Leriche teaches visual arts at the UniversitĂ© Paris 1 PanthĂ©on-Sorbonne. Jean Michel Fickingerteaches photography at the École Nationale SupĂ©rieure d’Art de Nancy. http://dljmf.org

NESHAT SHIRIN 

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 VAUTRELLE BRUNO

Born 1968 in Chalons, in the Champagne, France. Master of photography at the ISNA of Metz, France, in 1990. Assistant of Bruno Jarret and Roger Turqueti from 1993 to 1997 for shooting still life in the studio.

Independent photographer since 1997, mainly works in the studio (still life : CosmĂ©tic, Jewelry, Liquours, Luxury Accessories for advertising campaigns for press and bill-boards ) Visuals commissioned for advertising campaign by Guerlain, Jil Sander, Vichy, LancĂŽme, Vittel, Hennessy, Maxmara, Ford, Lancaster, L’OrĂ©al, Biotherm, Clarins, JP Gaultier, Chanel, Dior, Clan Campbell, Glen Turner, Carte Noire, Nespresso, Avene, Lipton, J&B 

Represented by Cécile Rodrigue from 2000 to 2008 and Guillaume Derville LeBookMaker  since 2009 for professional advertising still life shooting. Vautrelle is very much influenced by the group f.64, founded in 1932 by Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston, thus showing a nearly fanatical quest for style preciseness  and technical perfection. Vautrelle is always in search of the magic harmony that light creates between the different elements of a landscape, much more than actually rendering shapes and materials. His images often have therefore a disembodied and immaterial aspect.

WEIBEL PETER

Peter Weibel (* March 5, 1944 in Odessa, USSR) is an artist, curator and theoretician. Raised in Upper Austria he started to study French and cinematography in Paris. In 1964 he began to study medicine in Vienna, but changed soon to mathematics, with an emphasis on logic. Peter Weibel’s oeuvre can be described in the following categories: Conceptual Art, Performance, Experimental Film, Video art and Computer art. Starting from semiotic and linguistic reflections (Austin, Jakobson, Peirce, Wittgenstein, ...) as from 1965 Peter Weibel developed an artistic language, which led him from experimental literature to performance.

In his performative actions he explores not only the "media" language and body, but also film, video, audiotape and interactive electronic environments. Critically he analyzes their function for the construction of reality. Besides taking part in happenings with members of the Vienna Actionism he develops as from 1967 (together with Valie Export, Ernst Schmidt jr. and Hans Scheugl) an "expanded cinema". It is inspired by the American Expanded Cinema and reflects the ideological and technological conditions of cinematic representation. Peter Weibel elaborates these reflections as from 1969 in his video tapes and installations.

With his television action "tv und vt works", which is broadcast by the Austrian Television (ORF) in 1972 he transcends the borders of the gallery space and queries video technology in its application as a mass medium. Peter Weibel follows his artistic aims using a large variety of materials, forms and techniques: text, sculpture, installation, film and video. In 1978 he turns to music. Together with Loys Egg he founds the band "Hotel Morphila Orchester". In the mid 1980s he explores the possibilities of computer aided video processing. Beginning of the 1990s he realizes interactive computer-based installations. Here again he addresses the relation between media and the construction of reality. In his lectures and articles Weibel comments on contemporary art, media history, media theory, film, video art and philosophy.

As theoretician and curator he pleads for a form of art and art history that includes history of technology and history of science. In his function as a university professor and director of institutions like the Ars Electronica, Linz, the Institute for New Media in Frankfurt and the ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe he influenced the European Scene of the so called Computer art through conferences, exhibitions and publications.

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SCULPTURE

BORER CARLO

Carlo Borer is deliberately autodidact as an artist. He has been working freelance since 1981, beginning with figurative paintings, drawings, and three-dimensional works made of polyester and electrical light. Since 1991, he has been building objects out of stainless steel or aluminum.

And in 1999, he started using 3D computer graphics to design, develop, and construct sculptures, installations, furniture and utilitarian objects, such as espresso machines, ventilators, and mailboxes.[2] A laser is used to cut the forms out of the sheet metal, which are then rounded off and welded. Borer refers to works that have come about like this as Transformers, Loops, and Clouds.

 Though Borer takes his inspirations for his No Readymades and his Spaceships from pieces he has found, nevertheless, he creates the works as complex forms in virtual reality by means of CAD systems that have been further developed especially for this.[4] Carlo Borer lives in Wanzwil, and maintains his studio in Zuchwil.

CARO SIR ANTHONY

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DANA YVES

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DONG LAK LIM

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EDMOND LOUIS VINCENT

Born in Nimes, France, Vincent Edmond Louis attended Central Saint Martins College of Art in London, England from which he received an unconditional offer. Having pursued photography from a very young age, Vincent has constantly tackled various ways of pushing the boundaries of what we have come to consider traditional Fine Art Photography. Katelijne de Backer (Armory, Scope, Lehmann Maupin) has actually named this technique “Photography Revisited”.

Whether he adds paint to enhance the image or remove the subject matter, recounts his memories by simply writing on the photograph, depicts the passing of time by tearing up and putting back together portraits, or manipulating an image to create larger-than-life installation, Vincent is continuously seeking to add a multitude of layers to the otherwise twodimensional medium. Hence allowing the viewer to participate in the work.

When lacking subject material Vincent can be found in his studio reviving discarded everyday objects and giving them a new life as art work. Always keeping an open mind, Vincent continuously searches for new frontiers, travelling the world to gain an insight into foreign cultures and documenting characters from different backgrounds and styles.

The viewer is invited to discover an unknown world, where the image is placed in a new setting, thus makes you use your imagination. Vincent Edmond Louis has exhibited in New York, Paris, London, Stockholm, New Delhi, Monaco, Miami, Gothenburg, Bogota, Istanbul, Geneva, Baden- Baden, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Crans-Montana and Zurich.

JOAQUIM EVERS

For further information please contact the gallery.

GALLOPIN DARA

Born in 1982 the in Geneva the Swiss / Iranian artists made his first artistic steps while studying in Cambridge. He continued his studies in Oxford, England before a drastic change in his life and a move to Madrid, Spain i twa sthere when he finally decided to devote his life completly to art and not part-time.

As a result he went to the Libera Accademia di Belle Arte, RUFA and finished his bachelor of Arts at the prestigous Ecole Cantonal d`art de Lausanne. Gallopin quickly started to focus on his love for pop art and his fascination for the 80`s. His paintings are a mix of shapes, colors and souvenirs. Feeling limited to the paper and the wall he decided to mix his artistic vision with engineering and make the impossible possible.

His sculptures are a hommage to childhood dreams and futuristic visions. An art version of the famous Hoverboard or different hommages to cartoons are proof of this vision. In 2013 he participated at the group show at the gallery entiteld The Young Collective. Since then his work was shown at several art fairs in Miami, Basel, London and Istanbul.

JONES ALLEN

The art of Allen Jones is an extended meditation on the roles we play. How do we situate ourselves in the world? What constitutes personality? Jones catalogues the ways in which people deal with the threat of extinction: strategies for survival in the mad dance of life, with the chance of some fun along the way. This is no detached scientific analysis, but a vibrant dialogue, full of wit and humour.

Allen Jones is fortunate in his versatility, able to turn with equal skill from oil painting to sculpture, then back to watercolour, print-making or drawing. The variousness of medium does not undermine the impact of his work, for the consistency of his aims and subject provides an essential continuity.

And in a very real sense, we (the audience) make his meaning. Jones likes to tease his viewers visually, as well as thematically. The line created by the edge of a steel plate will – in the active process of describing a shape – move around a sculpture, appearing almost disembodied, before transforming into a plane, which in turn will box-in a form with suggested volume, before moving out into a line again.

It’s as if the artist practises sleight-of-hand, yet the effects are optical, not intentionally deceptive. As Jones himself says, the work “moves in and out of statement”. ( excerpt Andrew Lambirth – “Kaleidoscope” for Galerie Frank Pages)

ÖZMENOGLU ARDAN

The foundation of my art springs forth from the idea of repetition as it investigates the process of image consumption, history, and permanence in relation to mass production, ritual, and accompanying psychological states. My investigation into our consumption of image splits off into two independent yet complimentary impulses. In some of my pieces, repetition provides social commentary; in others, it conjures a feeling of ritual and a more personal space for a contemplative mood.

In some works I slice a flat image down to its constituent parts, like the levels of a topographic map. The flat image, existing now on multiple slides of glass, is abstracted and becomes sculpture, captured within and between the glass as it interacts with its medium and becomes a different image depending on the position of the viewer. This is the creation of dimension, mood and meaning for the viewer.

In other works, I subject images to reproduction on that most ubiquitous yet disposable of modern conveniences, the Post-it. Social commentary enters into the experience as the images eventually curl and fall away like so many autumn leaves. Whether commenting on the historical durability or transience of an image or sculpting with such fragile media as wire, glass slides or tree branches, my approach to my art and its sources has been and will always be contemporary in the extreme: my investigation into image coexists with aesthetic gestures that challenge, provoke and invite. Ardan Özmenoglu, 2008

PONCET ANTOINE

Poncet’s sculpture is the symbiosis of shape and volume. The perfection of volumes and the elegance of the shapes are breath-taking as well as the beauty of his translucide patina and pure marbles. Poncet’s work is sensual, smooth, round, the mere expression of harmony, seducing and attracting the viewer.

One cannot refrain from touching, the finger follows the smooth edges, runs around the opening, stops shortly and carries on in another direction. It is intentional. “Movement is essential in my work. Everything is movement in nature, in life. The search for perfect balance is essential for sculpture, pushing aside with the palm of the hands everything that stands out and could lead to a fall, just keeping in its apparent envelope this rare and inexplicable life, like water living between two shores.

If it is difficult to push the material to the wall to reach a feeling of fulfilment, it is this same sheer difficulty that fascinates me. To make sculpture, you need to live the material, understand it, love it
.” Poncet was familiar with Arp, Brancusi, Laurens, Penalba and Moore to name a few.

SOBAIC MILOS

The world as a "dangerous place" by Beate Reifenscheid Life is dangerous and death is lurking beyond the idyll. The locations that Milos Sobaic creates are dangerous, highly dramatic and in every case destructive. Nothing is how it should be and nothing remains as it was before. Danger and death lurk ubiquitously and it is especially this prevailing mood of a sudden switch, possible at any moment, from ordinariness into the nightmare scenario that confers the strange uneasiness onto Sobaic's works. Milos Sobaic has been living in Paris for more than thirty years. Born in Monte Negro in 1944 he travelled widely due to his father's profession as a diplomat and discovered art at an early age. However his early childhood years were not always carefree, at least during and shortly after the Second World War when the need was the greatest.

Sobaic reports in his newly published monography,

1 that as a child he found the balconies of his parental apartment in destroyed Belgrade (1948) to be immensely impressive. He still experiences the same nightmare night after night. The balconies fall with a violent crash into the abyss. He had already realised then that everything that appeared to be safe only turned out to be a gaping wound and that the world had got thrown out of joint. Milos Sobaic draws a large part of his artistic motivation from these experiences and feelings, which devastated the foundations of his absolute trust as a child. From this time onwards the uncertainty of the human being was to be his theme in art, his paintings and in the installations that he has created since the early 1970s. Sobaic had studied art and painting in Belgrade but it did not keep him in his homeland where he could not see any prospects for his artistic activities.

In 1972, accompanied by only two suitcases, he and his wife ventured into the art metropolis of Paris where he still lives and works today. His artistic beginnings point initially to - but only on the first viewing - visible references to the old-master style of painting, of Dutch and old-German still-lives, which display a certain amount of melancholy, and in which thoughts of vanitas play a large role. The relationship affects less the level of the subtle, at times trompe-l®Ɠil style of painting with its allusion-rich repertoire and its implicit appeal to the connoisseur to decode its "intimate" message than the way in which mortality is presented. In Milos Sobaic's paintings there is no alternative to life. For example in a "Nature morte" from 1969, a human head appears next to some earthenware (two jugs and a vessel) and which in the end strikes you as hardly any different to the objects themselves. The face seems to be asleep but also injured at the same time.

It remains almost unresolved whether a corpse is being presented here. Struts and scaffolds form a strangely striking framework for a support that appears as absurd as it is useless. The confusion occurs because an almost natural looking head is shown instead of the common skull. The pure vanitas thoughts contribute all the more to the moment of horror. But this horror does not come in form of a sudden shock but rather as a sneaking horror, arriving “subcutaneously” by way of irritation. On another Nature morte“ (1968-71) the scene in the foreground (a richly-laid table at which a woman is sitting, musing) is placed adjacent to a type of Calvary hill in the background with two hanged people and numerous corpses on the battlefield of life.

The melancholic-looking woman at the table is not aware of the death and the mutilation in the background. As if standing on a balustrade, the wine bottles and a skull separate the interior from the outside world and enable the different levels to merge from a colour point of view. A blue planet brings unexpected dynamism into the setting (it is unclear whether the planet is falling to earth or is racing away from it). The lifeless, dehumanised earth and the constellation of the stars emerging from the balance are clashing against each other - a shot for liberation? This question is still open. For a short time the pictures are still consolidating around extravagant characters and plot strands, which pay tribute to the thought that everything in the world (and apparently also in the world beyond) has been thrown into chaos and that life can no longer be possible in such a tumultuousness of death and disorder. Two versions of "L'Abatage" from 1970 culminate in the visions of the apocalypse and of the atomic catastrophe since the latter appears in the larger version primarily in a yellow-red colour scheme. The horrific magnitude of the fall-out from the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki are presented worldwide in the same way as the dreadful consequences of taking the sleeping pill Contergan, which led to limb deformities in embryos. The most different variations of the apocalypse shock modern civilisations again and again even more than the Second World War and Sobaic uses this in his work in a different way.

The human form is increasingly becoming a mere shell of inanimate, de-individualised creatures subjugated to monstrous mutations of an unleashed nature. In fact it is precisely "L'Abbatage" (from the Paris private collection), which intimates the disintegration of circumstances and realities, not only by laying a sulphurous yellow colour poisonously and destructively over life, but also through the deliberate blurring of the protagonists and of the scenario onto which, as also in the lack of clarity of the picture edges, gnawing, devouring streaks of colour had been placed. By incorporating the blurring, Sobaic insidiously thwarts and questions the time continuum. Space and time are two significant, large representations in Sobaic's painting as is demonstrated in the following. Numerous reminiscences of historical models are identified in Sobaic's work and which establish references to warlike, martial events, which are at the same time of unspeakable horror as if driven by dreadful visions, and which not infrequently substantiate direct timely associations to warlike disputes.

For Modernist Art it is primarily the period since the Early Romantic Period that is exemplary here as far as many of the image concepts are concerned. This also becomes binding for Sobaic, especially in view of psychic factors such as fear, trembling, questions about the loss of personality and/or identity and finally the perpetual question in quest of the contextual meaning of the "modern" human being in the same way that literary figures and philosophers had understood this since the Early Romantic Period. The fact that here not only religious theses but also the emerging interest of the late 18th century in the psyche, the soul and individual self-determination of the human being were becoming of increasing importance, can also be seen as decisive here. In this connection we shall refer sketchily and in a very cursory way to Heinrich FĂŒsslis' "Der Nachtmahr" from 1791 (Freies Deutsches Hochstift, Goethemuseum Frankfurt).

This acquires a fundamental principle of negative, inner powers in everyday life and thereby can be credited as one of the earliest classic examples of investigation into the soul. No less significant in this context is EugÚne Delacroix' "Sardanapals Tod", 1826/27 (Musée du Louvre, Paris), which shows the martial barbarity of killing in a hitherto unknown, oriental environment full of sensuality. Here the "erotic permissiveness or blood-thirsty brutality was put on display and where blood and eros figured as symbols of the power of the irrational. These subjects were the real fashion in the 19th Century and that was not only connected with the fact that the middle-class visitors to the art galleries were shocked, because they described unbridled passions in unusually daring forms of expression. The cause for the moralistic shock and indignation was also used to confirm the superiority of European civilisation."

2 A large potential for sensuality is unfurled in SobaicÂŽs works also.

They appeal to people to look at them only then to turn their backs on their desire for voyeurism in fright and disgust. However, sensuality continues to play an important role, since all actions of the protagonists originate from a totally ordinary every day event. Context and context-alienation - in the same way as Sobaic acts with it - are in a perpetual inter-relationship with each other. But if one stays with a historical classification of Sobaic's works, one thing must never be absent, namely Francisco de Goya's dark visions formulated in the "Desastres de la guerra", in which he creates a mixture of collective horror and individual realisation and introduces a very finely nuanced undertone, whose allusions and concealed intimations only a few dared to decipher. In the "Quinta del sordo" (1819-1824) Goya perfected a unique mixture of Spanish folklore, story-tales and a lively presence of fear and anxiety of the Numinous, for which a precise purpose was evaded.

The ground floor introduces you, with its relaxed succession of colourful portrayals, into the world of witches and antiquity. References are made here to the portrayals of "Witches Sabbath", "Saturn eating his children", "Romeria de San Isidro", which are placed alongside "Judith and Holofernes", "Man in a Cowl" and "Two old women eating". Upstairs, the "Pilgrimage to San Isadore" is given particular emphasis. The so-called "Black Pictures" of the "Quinta del Sordo" deliver a scenario of horror and violence, which exercise higher, darker powers and to which human beings as a mass are totally delivered. Like lemmings they follow their apparently inevitable fate. Even in scenes which are obviously meant as individual studies, the image of the human being is distorted into a grimace and into a skull ("Man in a Cowl " / " Two old women eating ").

The work most closely related to the picture themes of Milos Sobaic are those two larger frescos "Witches Sabbath" and "Romeria de San Isidro". Wilhelm Messerer briefly outlines the mural: "They are, more than usual, in Goya's work, representations of mass with faces and limbs horrifically smashed together and crumpled, and staring or blurry eyes."

3 Added to this is that in contrast to the otherwise colorful style of Goya, hardly any use of colour has been made at all here. Goya's murals pulse with dark brown and black. The sky in the "Pilgrimage" is still shimmering brightly but is tending inevitably towards a sulphurous, anxious yellow, whereas he withdraws all light completely in "Romeria". It is precisely in Sobaic's works at the end of the 1960s and at the very beginning of the 1970s that it is possible to note this spiritual relationship with the "Black Pictures" through their not any less powerfully expressed depths of fear. (See also: La Foule, 1973-75).

4 But also from the late 19th Century, in the circle of Odilon Redon, Max Klinger and Alfred Kubin and from the surrealism of the 20th Century with its protagonists Max Ernst and André Masson many indications are offered of which Sobaic was presumably aware. It was precisely through the dark visions of Alfred Kubin and also through the powerful intertwining of the work of André Masson with the philosophical writings of Heraclite and Friedrich Nietzsche, that deeper research into the context of Sobaic and into the degree of the questioning of existence in view of the human being would certainly be advisable.

5 But this goes too far here. Against the darkness and the shock of the surrealists, Sobaic delivers, but also in a strange way, no fewer irritating moments. Even in the darkest fight and deepest torture, indications of mobility appear, which are ensured through bicycles and small cars. Basic forms of the mechanised world seem to remain viable. White and red barriers and posts, which have been enlisted to control the traffic or even to structure an imaginary racecourse emerge as if they are directed by an arbitrariness in the apocalyptic scenes: Surreal alien elements which intimate a system of law and order. They show perspectives which seem to lead out of the chaos. A vague reason for hope?

6 In the early 1970s Sobaic largely parts with a large entourage of people and extras and from now on he concentrates more strongly on only a few actors. But those being represented are shown less and less in their intact physical presence but are mutilated, dismembered and only shown distorted. They are still only de-individualised creatures who devote themselves to the banality of every day life. Similar to the case in a dissection, body parts are found which the viewer believes would be returned after the autopsy of the skinned body together with the underlying muscle tissues, the tendon cords and the bones. The self-contained unit of the body is no longer guaranteed. The innermost part is exposed, but as if it were a revelation of the innermost (soul), this radical opening was also proved to be destructive and did not result in any understanding. Time and again is this quest for the innermost part exhausted and time and again body parts explode and the "fragmented" human being inflicts wounds onto himself. It offers an image of the external and the internal. Nothing is seen to be intact any more and yet one believes that the construction, the functioning and the actions of human beings can be decoded under Sobaic's fingers. Even the dependencies on each other become ever more concise. It does not disturb those displayed that they are only a rudimentary entity of something originally that (possibly) was intact. It also does not hinder them, in their partly dynamic, hectic operation to be held back from something. The location of the events are often intimate; bathrooms recur: Dark chambers with diffuse lighting, in which the act of a wet shave invites an action of self-mutilation or bathtubs are staged as sacrificial sites.

7 For the time being the drastic climax is formed by a short sequence of images that have the harmless title "Paysage" (Countryside) and in which decapitated heads are accumulated. In some cases these only occupy the upper third of the picture, but their dark, grotesquely distorted faces completely dominate the scene. A stream of red dripping down a white background spreading out into a laugh has close associations with blood.

8 This brutal statement forms a temporary final brushstroke in Sobaic's work, which never subsequently follows this level of extreme barbarity. Even the picture statement changes, even though numerous graphic mosaic-type modules remain. However, from now on death is no longer Sobaic's main subject area. The mutilation of the human body takes a different turn. The body is more closely integrated into a process which figures between (pseudo)-individual actions and society and/or the general scope of activity. With Sobaic it is granted the most central role within world affairs, even within his negative forms and perspectives. "The body is perhaps the primary metaphor for a society's perception of itself. The individual and spoken language are what make up the social body, the physical body is a kind of boundary between biology and society, between drives and discourse.“

9 Faced with this horizon of understanding in which the human body serves as a metaphor for society, Sobaic's works from the 1980s gain a new dimension: Chaos and disorder as a fundamental subject of a perpetual questioning of the circumstances of life and everyday attributes continue as constants. In many cases Sobaic now combines interiors (often offices) with views of a big-city environment. The human being is no longer fragmented but doubled or tripled many times. He works like his own echo, but he also intensifies the movement as an active activity within an otherwise static context. Haziness and blurring of movement sequences increasingly bring a rise in tempo into the scene.

10 The subject of "Locations" (Lieux) also appears in the same way as that of specific times such as for example: "À 20:07 heures", 1984. The precision of the hour and the minute is contradictory to the imprecise location of the office, of the actor, who is not recognisable as an individual anyway, and of the erratic gesticulations. Increasingly Sobaic speeds up the rhythm and occasionally lightens his colour palette which is changing more now to a cold blue/green. Time, space and movement are now the main themes in Sobaic's work, who thereby introduces himself into the current discussion on art and philosophy. The precise question of the plausibility of a one-dimensional cognition of time is raised over and over again. Sobaic delivers through his works, and through the dehumanised beings that can only be ascribed through their bodies to the human species, the intoxicating new time dimension of cognition, as though with the ultrasound of completed sequences of events. The where-from and where-to remain fully open in all this.11 Only towards the end of the 1980s does one again become aware of an intensification of the substance matter and occasionally unequivocal indications to political contexts appear. Significant of course are "La Bataille de Kosovo 1389", from 1989, or the historical references to the history of France in "L® Assasinat de Marat“, 1988 (as a counter-balance to Ingres' famous work) and "L®Autopsie de Marie-Antoinette" and "Prise de la Bastille" (both from 1988) and also the religious references, such as "Saint Georges terrassant le dragon", 1989. They clarify once again that which has been applied in Sobaic's work since the beginning namely that each scene, so absurd and martial, has its origins in his early childhood of traumatic war experiences but which also manifest themselves again and again beyond the acute war stories in the most varied of facets, even in everyday life. In the continual progression of the actions, which are increasingly dominating the pictures, a further group emerges in the early 1990s, which, almost unexpectedly, conveys something light, cheerful and buoyant. The diver ("Nageur", also varied under "La Plage").12 Never before had Sobaic used such a pure blue! Through the coolness of the sea and through the diving into an elementary element of our planet, new expanses open. The diver is all action: Arms and legs whirl around in the sea and offer a strange contrast to the calm blue of the water. Yet despite all the lightheartedness of the subject and the friendly associations of beach and holidays, the viewer subliminally suspects the threat that the sea with its huge expanse can also be interpreted as impenetrable depths, in which the unexpected is lurking for him.

The "Nageur" from 1994 finally13 falls into the abyss. Immediately afterwards the gestures in the picture become charged and explosive and the threat increases until it bursts. Sobaic now perfectly separates individual gestures, whether they are arms and hands or legs and feet. The limbs stand pars pro toto. The colourism of his works increases again in the death-suggesting colours of red-orange, black and dark blue. A simultaneity of actions goes hand in hand with the rapidity of the actions and which brings the picture to bursting. Simultaneously with the installations which Sobaic has developed, wash basins, showers and bathtubs again become fixed elements in his work. The world as a toilet. At the end of this long picture development, bodies mutate with Sorbaic from the torso into a skewered sacrificial lamb that, like the body of Christ, was put on display.14 The apocalypse of humanity is once again totally present and has completely captured human beings in its creaturalness and existence and rejects hope and any future outlooks. Sobaic, who continuously exclaims this with intensity and lack of compromise, is not far from the visions of Francis Bacon in this point. Therefore Sobaic contrasts the aesthetics of Bacon with the pure apocalypse as a hopeless way of life, in the pure form of nihilism, as a contemporary vision of a planet which only still functions as a non-place, as "Lieux Ă  haut risque". Life not only ends fatally. Life is Death.

STAEHLI BEATRICE

FEATHER MARKS | Christian Reder” .A found feather provides joy as only a few objects do with such immediacy. As signs of flying, feathers hint at possibilities, at lightness, at hovering. They are linked with notions of how the space turns when you are in the air and all horizons, all perspectives lose their reference to a fixed point of view. The feather is a symbol of the negation of everything that is heavy, of all hindrances, a symbol of taking off without effort and a controllable fall.

Men have always thought it unfair that birds have feathers and they do not. Imitating birds has thus remained one of man’s lasting goals. Since feathers make it possible to fly, protect against heat, cold, and wetness, and are both disguise and adornment, a complex cosmos of communicatively erotic signals, they are to be regarded as ”artifacts” of another world in its own right. The world of eagles, falcons, pigeons, swallows, and birds-of-paradise with its enormous impact on all forms of symbolizing has left its mark on patterns, even on patterns of utopian mobile societies which believe in having found their rules forever. Yet, the mechanically reflexive processes only resemble freedom even in the feathered world. Nevertheless, this world still holds many secrets: despite all successes of investigation and copying, nobody knows how flights coordinate their wild and, as it seems, often completely unmotivated maneuvers or how the navigation of migratory birds works.

The comprehensive collection of feathers Béatrice StÀhli draws upon in her recent works dates from a time in which rules of conservation had not set certain limits to the decimation of endangered species. Treating the feathers almost as relics, StÀhli increases the value of her finds and emphasizes their melancholy aura. But what they stand for at first sight is laconically minimized and transformed through the way they are presented. The exotic character of their material and its seductiveness, the stereotypical images of beauty, pride, and natural freedom each original plumage triggers, are exposed to a present-day differentiating gaze. What one remains aware of is the fact that romantic approaches shape meanings independently of all deconstruction. And, at the same time, one is irritated that a lot of things have happened to the feathers and the associations linked with them, as a number of them found in one place, be it in nature or in a store, generally points to some tragedy. Being declared to be something artificial and traded as merchandise, the differences to the natural are blured.

In some cases, the colors and the marking of the feathers still correspond to the original condition; in others, they have been changed. What seems to be rare becomes more valuable, dearer. Feeble gray and black shades are regarded as too trite. StÀhli uses such differences in order to let the material show itself off to advantage. It is what it is. Forming feather surfaces, feather bodies, or mobile objects, the material, even if it has been colored, reveals how subtly it reflects light and how its qualities, in a very nuanced manner, allude to the functions in which the existence of feathers is grounded. Among birds, part of the more conspicuous plumage is female, part male; among men, the more impressive plumes were reserved for chieftains and kings who wanted to distinguish themselves clearly from others. The feather itself has preserved a female aura. »

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